Comparative physiognomy; or, Resemblances between men and animals . y the moral and intellectual faculties, are verydifferent from wdiat they are in animals. This is necessary,if we would form a correct idea of the person who has any ofthe marks of the lion in his countenance. Such a person iseither generous or cruel, peaceable or savage, noble or treach-erous, magnanimous or mean. The most truly magnanimousperson is not above performing menial offices for the sake ofthe happiness of others, and this is from a faculty that in ani-mals and in bad people is the very opposite of magnanimity—it is

- Image ID: 2AN06T6
Comparative physiognomy; or, Resemblances between men and animals . y the moral and intellectual faculties, are verydifferent from wdiat they are in animals. This is necessary,if we would form a correct idea of the person who has any ofthe marks of the lion in his countenance. Such a person iseither generous or cruel, peaceable or savage, noble or treach-erous, magnanimous or mean. The most truly magnanimousperson is not above performing menial offices for the sake ofthe happiness of others, and this is from a faculty that in ani-mals and in bad people is the very opposite of magnanimity—it is
The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: 2AN06T6
Comparative physiognomy; or, Resemblances between men and animals . y the moral and intellectual faculties, are verydifferent from wdiat they are in animals. This is necessary,if we would form a correct idea of the person who has any ofthe marks of the lion in his countenance. Such a person iseither generous or cruel, peaceable or savage, noble or treach-erous, magnanimous or mean. The most truly magnanimousperson is not above performing menial offices for the sake ofthe happiness of others, and this is from a faculty that in ani-mals and in bad people is the very opposite of magnanimity—it is from a faculty that may be called meanness. This fac-ulty has a large sign in the lion; but as it aspires to be the THE LION. 27 servant, and to do the bidding of Magnanimity and of all thehigher faculties, the lion stands for nobility in the human race,as his physiognomy shows. The love of overcoming andthe love of triumph are elementsof tremendous power in the lion,and are prodigious in those whoare to be classed under the headof lions. The traits which dis-. tinguish this animal are suitable to royalty. Of the Britishsovereigns, William the Conqueror, William II., Henry L,Richard I., King John, Edward I., Richard II., Richard III.,James I., William III., and George I., have the lion stronglymarked in their countenances; while nearly all the rest havea wonderful resemblance to oxen. We have examples also oflikenesses to the lion in the persons and characters of MaryQueen of Scots, Oliver Cromwell, and Prince George. Rob-ert Boyle is another of the same class. ^ c< »MPABATIYE PHYSIOGNOMY. CHAPTER III.