. Commercial fisheries review. Fisheries; Fish trade. 39. Fig. 4 - Species of crustacean larvae, magnified about 50 diame- ters, found among planktonic organisms. (From Johnstone, Scott, Chadwick: Marine Plankton) Plankton's Nutritive Value Plankton seems rich in nutrient materials essential for man. Its values are similar to hay's: proteins, 11.5%; carbohydrates, 79.3%; ash, 7%. "Thus, there are no substantial dif- ferences between the content of the nutrient substances in marine plankton and in this staple forage food plant from the land." The high protein content of animal plankto

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. Commercial fisheries review. Fisheries; Fish trade. 39. Fig. 4 - Species of crustacean larvae, magnified about 50 diame- ters, found among planktonic organisms. (From Johnstone, Scott, Chadwick: Marine Plankton) Plankton's Nutritive Value Plankton seems rich in nutrient materials essential for man. Its values are similar to hay's: proteins, 11.5%; carbohydrates, 79.3%; ash, 7%. "Thus, there are no substantial dif- ferences between the content of the nutrient substances in marine plankton and in this staple forage food plant from the land." The high protein content of animal plankto
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. Commercial fisheries review. Fisheries; Fish trade. 39. Fig. 4 - Species of crustacean larvae, magnified about 50 diame- ters, found among planktonic organisms. (From Johnstone, Scott, Chadwick: Marine Plankton) Plankton's Nutritive Value Plankton seems rich in nutrient materials essential for man. Its values are similar to hay's: proteins, 11.5%; carbohydrates, 79.3%; ash, 7%. "Thus, there are no substantial dif- ferences between the content of the nutrient substances in marine plankton and in this staple forage food plant from the land." The high protein content of animal plankton is especially significant because world hunger involves the shortage of calories and, even more critically, the shortage of protein--es- pecially animal protein. Planktonic creatures have important amounts of other nutrients: crustaceans have Vitamins A and D. Krill have large amounts of Vitamin A, especially in the eyes. Plankton's Palatability Regardless of its nutritional value, the UN report continues, "plankton must be palatable to humans if it is to have any significance as a source of food." Limited experience shows that some people will not eat it, while others consider it a fine food. In 1952, Alain B. Bombard, a French phy- sician, sought to prove that a man could sur- vive a long time on a raft or small boat from nutrients in the sea. Bombard drifted from the Canary Islands to the West Indies and sur- vived 65 days. (A 10-day period is regarded as the limit man can survive such circum- stances.) Part of the explanation of his sur- vival was that he ate plankton. It did not rain for 23 days and plankton supplied part of the water he needed. He said it tasted ". . like lobster, at times like shrimp and at others like some vegetable." A group that studied plankton's palatability reported it "had a mildly pleasant taste, being somewhat reminiscent of shrimp or oysters." At first, some panel members refused to eat plankton but, after tastin

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