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. College collection of palaeontology. MAMMALIA. 29 Guinea-pig, Porcupine, Hare and Capybara, all have perfect clavicles. The skeleton is slight and feeble. The Beaver and Capybara are now the giants of the order; but the Muridce are the typical family. No unequivocal evidence has been obtained of remains of rodents in strata more ancient than the Eocene Tertiary, but they are frequent in the lowest fresh-water Eocene, belonging to the Squirrel family. The hares appear in the Middle Miocene. In the Pliocene most species belong to existing genera. The fossils are chieflv found in lacustrine mar

. College collection of palaeontology. MAMMALIA. 29 Guinea-pig, Porcupine, Hare and Capybara, all have perfect clavicles. The skeleton is slight and feeble. The Beaver and Capybara are now the giants of the order; but the Muridce are the typical family. No unequivocal evidence has been obtained of remains of rodents in strata more ancient than the Eocene Tertiary, but they are frequent in the lowest fresh-water Eocene, belonging to the Squirrel family. The hares appear in the Middle Miocene. In the Pliocene most species belong to existing genera. The fossils are chieflv found in lacustrine mar Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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REGTAE

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7.1 MB (289.2 KB Compressed download)

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1905 x 1311 px | 32.3 x 22.2 cm | 12.7 x 8.7 inches | 150dpi

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. College collection of palaeontology. MAMMALIA. 29 Guinea-pig, Porcupine, Hare and Capybara, all have perfect clavicles. The skeleton is slight and feeble. The Beaver and Capybara are now the giants of the order; but the Muridce are the typical family. No unequivocal evidence has been obtained of remains of rodents in strata more ancient than the Eocene Tertiary, but they are frequent in the lowest fresh-water Eocene, belonging to the Squirrel family. The hares appear in the Middle Miocene. In the Pliocene most species belong to existing genera. The fossils are chieflv found in lacustrine marls and bone-caves. No. 45. [21] Castoroides Ohioensis, Foster. Skull and Lower Jaw, right RAMUS (cast). This species is the most gigantic member of tlie or- der of rodents hitherto discovered, whetlier. recent or fossil. It is aliiu to the Beaver, but differs chiefly in a less development of the cerebrum, in more prominent though more slender, zygomatic arches, and in its dentition. The incisors are fluted, and the molars (numbering four in each ramus) consist of a series of elongated elliptical plates of enamel which include the dentine. The Castoroides differs from all other rodents in the size and conformation of the pterygoid processes and fossae. All the processes and fossae of the lower jaw are remarkably de- veloped. The genus abounded in North America throughout the Post-tertiary. The original specimen, supposed to belong to an animal nearly six feet in length, was found in 1841, in the Montezuma Marsh, near Clyde, N. Y., with shells of existing species, and is preserved in the Cabinet of Geneva Col- lege, N. Y. Size, 10 x 7.. ORDER EDENTATA. The Edentates, the lowest of the placental mammals, are dis- tinguished by the inferior character of their teeth, which have no complete roots, no true enamel, and are usually monophydont (without successors). There are no incisors,.with the exception that in the Armadillo tlie front pair of upper teeth encroach upon the intermaxil

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