. [Collected reprints, 1895-1916. Birds. If birds are protected and encouraged to nest about the farm and gar- den, they will do their share in destroying noxious insects and weeds, and a few hours spent in putting up boxes for bluebirds, martins, and wrens will prove a good investment. Birds are protected by law in many States, but it remains for the agriculturists to see that the laws are faithfully observed. THE CUCKOOS. (Cocoyzus americanus and C. erythrophthalmus.) Two species of cuckoos, the yellow-billed (fig. 1) and the black-billed, are common in the United States east of the Plains,

- Image ID: RDXK2M
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDXK2M
. [Collected reprints, 1895-1916. Birds. If birds are protected and encouraged to nest about the farm and gar- den, they will do their share in destroying noxious insects and weeds, and a few hours spent in putting up boxes for bluebirds, martins, and wrens will prove a good investment. Birds are protected by law in many States, but it remains for the agriculturists to see that the laws are faithfully observed. THE CUCKOOS. (Cocoyzus americanus and C. erythrophthalmus.) Two species of cuckoos, the yellow-billed (fig. 1) and the black-billed, are common in the United States east of the Plains, and a subspecies of the yellow-billed extends westward to the Pacific. While the two species are quite distinct, they do not differ greatly in food habits, and their economic status is practically the same.. Fig. 1 Tellow-billed cuckoo. An examination of 155 stomachs has shown that these cuckoos are much given to eating caterpillars, and, unlike most birds, do not reject those covered with hair. In fact, cuckoos eat so many hairy cater- pillars that the hairs pierce the inner lining of the stomach and remain there, so that when the stomach is opened and turned inside out, it appears to be lined with a thin coating of fur. An examination of the stomachs of 46 black-billed cuckoos, taken during the summer months, showed the remains of 906 caterpillars, 44 beetles, 96 grasshoppers, 100 sawflies, 30 stink bugs, and 15 spiders. In all probability more individuals than these were represented, but their remains were too badly broken for recognition. Most of the cater- pillars were hairy, and many of them belonged to a genus that lives in colonies and feeds on the leaves of trees, including the apple tree. One stomach was flUed with larvae of a caterpillar belonging to the. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original w

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