. Coleoptera : general introduction and Cicindelidae and Paussidae. 84 INTRODUCTION. erected into a separate family, but they appear to differ from theISilphid^e only in the formation of the anterior coxae and theirsurroundings. A large number of blind cave-insects of the generaBatJiyscia, Adelops, etc., belong to the family. The larvae of the various genera are very different, those ofNecrophorus being large, fleshy, inactive grubs, with small spinoseplates on the dorsal segments, while those of Silpha, in most cases,are very active and are onisciform, or shaped like wood-lice, withthe segmen

. Coleoptera : general introduction and Cicindelidae and Paussidae. 84 INTRODUCTION. erected into a separate family, but they appear to differ from theISilphid^e only in the formation of the anterior coxae and theirsurroundings. A large number of blind cave-insects of the generaBatJiyscia, Adelops, etc., belong to the family. The larvae of the various genera are very different, those ofNecrophorus being large, fleshy, inactive grubs, with small spinoseplates on the dorsal segments, while those of Silpha, in most cases,are very active and are onisciform, or shaped like wood-lice, withthe segmen Stock Photo
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. Coleoptera : general introduction and Cicindelidae and Paussidae. 84 INTRODUCTION. erected into a separate family, but they appear to differ from theISilphid^e only in the formation of the anterior coxae and theirsurroundings. A large number of blind cave-insects of the generaBatJiyscia, Adelops, etc., belong to the family. The larvae of the various genera are very different, those ofNecrophorus being large, fleshy, inactive grubs, with small spinoseplates on the dorsal segments, while those of Silpha, in most cases, are very active and are onisciform, or shaped like wood-lice, withthe segments above entirely chitinous, the abdominal ones beingfurnished with lateral processes ; they differ, however, considerablyinter se. One of the most peculiar genera belonging to the family isPteroloma, GylL, which superficially resembles Nebria and wasincluded by all the older workers under the Caeabid^e, untilErichson (Arch. Naturg. 1837, i, p. 119) pointed out its affinitiesto the Silphid^: ; it is remarkable for possessing two ocelli on. Fig. 39.—Necrophorus vespillo.Larva X 3. (After Schiodte.) the vertex, and the Japauese genus Camioleum, Lewis, which alsohas two ocelli, ought perhaps to be referred to the PTEKOLOMiNiE.Apatetica is another genus of Silphid^e, closely allied to Pterolomarwhose members very closely resemble species of Lebia; twospecies are known, one of which, A. lebioides, Hope, was originallyfound in the Himalayas. The Silphid^; are for the most part confined to the NorthernHemisphere and are characteristic of cold and temperate countries;very few occur in the Tropics. Necrodes, Necrophorus, Silphar CLA.MBID.E.—LEPTIJfIDJE. 85 and Choleva are each represented in India by one or two species, and possibly examples of the Liodexoe, etc., may be discovered, but no one as yet appears to have worked at the group, so far asthe Indian fauna is concerned. The SphvEritldyE and Clambidte have been classed with thevSiLPHiDiE, but through the wing venation the former

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