. Coast watch. Marine resources; Oceanography; Coastal zone management; Coastal ecology. The Roanoke voyages There's more than a Lost Colony For most people, Sir Walter Raleigh's colonization attempts hold a vague memory of a colony lost, but never found, and a child named Virginia. Ask folks what Ralph Lane, Arthur Barlowe and Sir Richard Gren- ville mean to Raleigh's efforts and they draw a blank. But Raleigh sponsored three voyages to North America—one for exploration and two for colonization. All of these efforts involved a small island that today we call Roanoke. Under a charter granted b

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. Coast watch. Marine resources; Oceanography; Coastal zone management; Coastal ecology. The Roanoke voyages There's more than a Lost Colony For most people, Sir Walter Raleigh's colonization attempts hold a vague memory of a colony lost, but never found, and a child named Virginia. Ask folks what Ralph Lane, Arthur Barlowe and Sir Richard Gren- ville mean to Raleigh's efforts and they draw a blank. But Raleigh sponsored three voyages to North America—one for exploration and two for colonization. All of these efforts involved a small island that today we call Roanoke. Under a charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I, Raleigh's first expedition of two ships set sail from Plymouth, April 27, 1584, led by Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe. These explorers were charged with finding a suitable site for a subsequent colony. April 1584 — Amadas and Barlowe set sail from Plymouth, England Utilizing the circular wind patterns of the Atlantic Ocean, the expedition sailed south to the Caribbean, then north with the Gulf Stream. On July 13, 1584, the voyagers anchored off the Outer Banks, calling their anchorage Port Ferdinando after their pilot, Simon Ferdinando. They claimed the nearby land for their queen. The English established friendly contact with the native Algonkian In- dians soon after their arrival. They traded items such as clothing and tin cups for the Indians' deerskins and food. After a trust had been built be- tween the Indians and English, Barlowe and seven other men took a small boat to visit an Indian village on an island called "Roanoak" about 20 miles away. No one knows how far the English explorers traveled during the 1584 ex- pedition. Barlowe, who recorded a brief history of the voyage, wrote of an "inclosed sea" (probably the Pamlico Sound) and numerous islands. He also wrote extensively about the abun- dance of fruit, wild game, fish and forestland. In August, the 1584 expedition set sail for England, taking two Indians,. Raleigh nev

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