. Cassell's natural history. Animals; Animal behavior. XATURAL HI STOUT.. -LPINE PHALA^ THE DOKMOUSE PHALANGEE.* This is a very small Marsupial animal, about six inches in length, including the tail, which measures nearly, if not quite, one-half. It is like a little Dormouse, with its soft fur, ashy-gi-ey in colour, large ears, and thick tail. They are broader, not so long in the leg, and usually larger than, the Dormouse, and the eyes are larger, and the upper jaw overhangs the lower. But they look just as fat and sleepy in the daytime. The habits of these animals, moreover, are much the same

. Cassell's natural history. Animals; Animal behavior. XATURAL HI STOUT.. -LPINE PHALA^ THE DOKMOUSE PHALANGEE.* This is a very small Marsupial animal, about six inches in length, including the tail, which measures nearly, if not quite, one-half. It is like a little Dormouse, with its soft fur, ashy-gi-ey in colour, large ears, and thick tail. They are broader, not so long in the leg, and usually larger than, the Dormouse, and the eyes are larger, and the upper jaw overhangs the lower. But they look just as fat and sleepy in the daytime. The habits of these animals, moreover, are much the same Stock Photo
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. Cassell's natural history. Animals; Animal behavior. XATURAL HI STOUT.. -LPINE PHALA^ THE DOKMOUSE PHALANGEE.* This is a very small Marsupial animal, about six inches in length, including the tail, which measures nearly, if not quite, one-half. It is like a little Dormouse, with its soft fur, ashy-gi-ey in colour, large ears, and thick tail. They are broader, not so long in the leg, and usually larger than, the Dormouse, and the eyes are larger, and the upper jaw overhangs the lower. But they look just as fat and sleepy in the daytime. The habits of these animals, moreover, are much the same, for the Phalangista living in Van Diemen's Land feeds on nuts and other similar food, which they hold in their fore paws, using them as hands. They are nocturnal, remaining asleep during the whole day, or, if dis- turbed, are not easily roused into a state of activity. They come forth in the evening, and are then more easy and rapid in their movements. Some of these were kept in the Zoological Gardens of London, and it was noticed that they made great use of their tail, which is prehensile, and thus not like that of the Doi-mouse. They ran about a small tree, using their paws and tail to hang on by, and using the tail as a suspender when they descended. Sometimes the tail is thrown in a reverse direction, and is turned over the back, and at other times, when the weather is cold, it is rolled closely up towards the under part, and coUed up almost between the thiglis. They are like little balls of fur, and are very gentle and harmless. Mr. Gould states that another kind of these Dormouse-looking creatures is veiy abundant in the northern portion of Van Diemen's Land, and that of all trees it appears to prefer the Banksia, whose numerous blossoms supply it with a never-ceasing store of food, both of insects and sweets. It under- goes a kind of hibernation somewhat similar to but not to the extent of that of the Dormouse. Tliese pretty little mai-supials are remarkable by having