Canadian mining journal January-June 1905 . ntly large scale. Eachlevel is coloured a different colour so as to be readily distin-guished. Every survey station is plotted and all the workingplaces are numbered to facilitate reference. The sill floors ofsquare set stopes are plotted. Only horizontal workings arerepresented, except raises. The plotting is carried on with aparallel ruler and the protractor before mentioned. The map is ruled into 100 inch squares, with sides N andS., and E. and W. All plottings are made from these lines.These co-ord lines are numbered; the intersection of the twol

Canadian mining journal January-June 1905 . ntly large scale. Eachlevel is coloured a different colour so as to be readily distin-guished. Every survey station is plotted and all the workingplaces are numbered to facilitate reference. The sill floors ofsquare set stopes are plotted. Only horizontal workings arerepresented, except raises. The plotting is carried on with aparallel ruler and the protractor before mentioned. The map is ruled into 100 inch squares, with sides N andS., and E. and W. All plottings are made from these lines.These co-ord lines are numbered; the intersection of the twol Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AKN50B

File size:

7.1 MB (364.5 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2082 x 1200 px | 35.3 x 20.3 cm | 13.9 x 8 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Canadian mining journal January-June 1905 . ntly large scale. Eachlevel is coloured a different colour so as to be readily distin-guished. Every survey station is plotted and all the workingplaces are numbered to facilitate reference. The sill floors ofsquare set stopes are plotted. Only horizontal workings arerepresented, except raises. The plotting is carried on with aparallel ruler and the protractor before mentioned. The map is ruled into 100 inch squares, with sides N andS., and E. and W. All plottings are made from these lines.These co-ord lines are numbered; the intersection of the twolines o •— o being taken off the claim to S. W. so that no diffi-culty will arise by the co-ords of a point being negative. Thesenumbers increase to the North and to the East. The notes are plotted as in Form X. Long Section Maps. (Form XI.—These are made in twoways:—Either (i) On the dipor (2) Vertical. I.—On the Dip— For this section a plane is generally chosen parallel to theaverage dip of the vein. The advantages of this are. of location are to be found and what kind of station it is; whe-ther it is a plug in back or cap of square set, etc. If a questionarises about any station it is looked up in this index and allparticulars are at hand. Conventions.—The usual appliances and instruments of adraughting-room ^re used. The protractor is one with a ver-nier reading to minutes made by Gurley. Several 6 foot steel straight edges are employed. Rulingpens made by Altneder are used. Higgins Inks and Winsor& Newton water colours are made use of. The conventionsused on all the maps are as follows:— (1) . The actual slope measurements taken in the mine canbe plotted on the section map without reduction. (2) . In calculating the cubical contents of stopes, etc.,measurements can be taken direct by scale from this section. II.—Vertical— This is a vertical plane generally through the strike of the vem. (1) If the vein is very irregular in dip, the above advan-tages do n

Search stock photos by tags