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. California fish and game. Fisheries -- California; Game and game-birds -- California; Fishes -- California; Animal Population Groups; Pêches; Gibier; Poissons. 306 CALIFORNIA HSH AND GAME. FIGURE 1. Net with dowels attached. Photograph by Kim McOeneghan, November 1976. Second, attention must be given to the path of rising scuba exhaust bubbles while positioning the net under a fish school. Bubbles ascending through the school disperse the fish. To capture fish which remained in or near kelp fronds, one side of the net was wrapped around the plant and the divers ascended with the net in this

. California fish and game. Fisheries -- California; Game and game-birds -- California; Fishes -- California; Animal Population Groups; Pêches; Gibier; Poissons. 306 CALIFORNIA HSH AND GAME. FIGURE 1. Net with dowels attached. Photograph by Kim McOeneghan, November 1976. Second, attention must be given to the path of rising scuba exhaust bubbles while positioning the net under a fish school. Bubbles ascending through the school disperse the fish. To capture fish which remained in or near kelp fronds, one side of the net was wrapped around the plant and the divers ascended with the net in this  Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

RG3NJN

File size:

7.1 MB (402.6 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1769 x 1412 px | 30 x 23.9 cm | 11.8 x 9.4 inches | 150dpi

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This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. California fish and game. Fisheries -- California; Game and game-birds -- California; Fishes -- California; Animal Population Groups; Pêches; Gibier; Poissons. 306 CALIFORNIA HSH AND GAME. FIGURE 1. Net with dowels attached. Photograph by Kim McOeneghan, November 1976. Second, attention must be given to the path of rising scuba exhaust bubbles while positioning the net under a fish school. Bubbles ascending through the school disperse the fish. To capture fish which remained in or near kelp fronds, one side of the net was wrapped around the plant and the divers ascended with the net in this fashion. Fishes in the fronds were frightened into the net as it was lifted. Schools of fish hovering over drift algae on sand bottoms were caught using the net in a seine-like manner. Here a third diver was useful to herd the fish toward the approaching net. After a "scoop", the net and captured fish were taken to the awaiting boat. There, an on-board assistant quickly removed the fish, placed them in holding tanks, and returned the net to the divers for another "scoop". Generally, the entire procedure took 5 to 10 min. This was difficult work for the divers, requiring much swimming and many descents and ascents. About 20 to 25 lifts could be made in a day by one team. Additional divers were useful to distribute the workload. In terms of catch-per-unit-of-effort, the net was most successful when used to catch juvenile blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus; juvenile kelp rockfish, Se- bastes atrovirens; and kelp surfperch, Brachyistius frenatus. juvenile blue rock- fish were captured in open areas between kelp plants, juvenile kelp rockfish were caught by wrapping plants, and kelp perch were captured beneath the canopy. Also taken were four other species of juvenile rockfish, three species. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations

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