. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 60.—Detail of roadbed of Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. A few miles of railway consisted of strap iron rails secured to a continuous line of granite blocks (a). From David Stevenson, Sketch of the Civil Engineering of North America (London, 1838). gradual grades, worked by the ordinary locomotive. Major Wilson was filling the wants of the time constructing as he said a "railway turnpike." [56] The rapidly increasing traflic on the Pennsylvania road, even before the completion of the Portage and and opening of the throug

- Image ID: RG7E47
. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 60.—Detail of roadbed of Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. A few miles of railway consisted of strap iron rails secured to a continuous line of granite blocks (a). From David Stevenson, Sketch of the Civil Engineering of North America (London, 1838). gradual grades, worked by the ordinary locomotive. Major Wilson was filling the wants of the time constructing as he said a "railway turnpike." [56] The rapidly increasing traflic on the Pennsylvania road, even before the completion of the Portage and and opening of the throug Stock Photo
Enlarge
https://www.alamy.com/licenses-and-pricing/?v=1 https://www.alamy.com/bulletin-united-states-national-museum-science-figure-60detail-of-roadbed-of-philadelphia-and-columbia-railroad-a-few-miles-of-railway-consisted-of-strap-iron-rails-secured-to-a-continuous-line-of-granite-blocks-a-from-david-stevenson-sketch-of-the-civil-engineering-of-north-america-london-1838-gradual-grades-worked-by-the-ordinary-locomotive-major-wilson-was-filling-the-wants-of-the-time-constructing-as-he-said-a-quotrailway-turnpikequot-56-the-rapidly-increasing-traflic-on-the-pennsylvania-road-even-before-the-completion-of-the-portage-and-and-opening-of-the-throug-image233734039.html
. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 60.—Detail of roadbed of Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. A few miles of railway consisted of strap iron rails secured to a continuous line of granite blocks (a). From David Stevenson, Sketch of the Civil Engineering of North America (London, 1838). gradual grades, worked by the ordinary locomotive. Major Wilson was filling the wants of the time constructing as he said a "railway turnpike." [56] The rapidly increasing traflic on the Pennsylvania road, even before the completion of the Portage and and opening of the throug
Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RG7E47
This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.
. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 60.—Detail of roadbed of Philadelphia and Columbia Railroad. A few miles of railway consisted of strap iron rails secured to a continuous line of granite blocks (a). From David Stevenson, Sketch of the Civil Engineering of North America (London, 1838). gradual grades, worked by the ordinary locomotive. Major Wilson was filling the wants of the time constructing as he said a "railway turnpike." [56] The rapidly increasing traflic on the Pennsylvania road, even before the completion of the Portage and and opening of the through line to the West, was sufficient to demonstrate the error that had been committed in constructing the Peters Island incline plane. The inclines on the Portage might be sufficient for through trade for many years, but the local trade between Philadelphia and Hollidaysburg, eastern end of the Mountain division, had increased to such an extent that it was evident the incline plane, at the Philadelphia end of the road, would soon be taxed beyond its capacity. Locomotives had not been in use on the road over one year before the delay to passenger trains became very annoying, and such pressure was brought on the Canal Commissioners that they ordered surveys to be made, with the object of substituting for the incline plane gradual grades that could be run with locomotives. The citizens were not idle; a branch road to avoid the plane was chartered, called the West Philadelphia Branch, a company organized, surveys made, and some little work done; financial trouble caused its suspension.184 Henry R. Campbell, then chief engineer of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown R. R., was mainly instrumental in forming a company to build a branch to cross the Schuylkill 184 The route of the West Philadelphia Railroad Company was located by Henry R. Campbell in 1835. More than to years later, when the legislature agreed to rerouting of the Philadelphia and Columbia to avoid the Schyulki