. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 37.—Pressing and milling room of the U.S. Mint, Philadelphia. Three toggle coining presses are shown in background; three coin milling machines are in left foreground. From Gleason s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion (July 17, 1852), vol. 3. He said bids would be considered for iron and brass castings, including; patterns, finishing by surface measure; also by day's work, including use of lathes, tools, etc. This interview was on a Saturday after- noon; he regretted that the time was so short and that he had not called on us sooner, fo

. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 37.—Pressing and milling room of the U.S. Mint, Philadelphia. Three toggle coining presses are shown in background; three coin milling machines are in left foreground. From Gleason s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion (July 17, 1852), vol. 3. He said bids would be considered for iron and brass castings, including; patterns, finishing by surface measure; also by day's work, including use of lathes, tools, etc. This interview was on a Saturday after- noon; he regretted that the time was so short and that he had not called on us sooner, fo Stock Photo
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. Bulletin - United States National Museum. Science. Figure 37.—Pressing and milling room of the U.S. Mint, Philadelphia. Three toggle coining presses are shown in background; three coin milling machines are in left foreground. From Gleason s Pictorial Drawing Room Companion (July 17, 1852), vol. 3. He said bids would be considered for iron and brass castings, including; patterns, finishing by surface measure; also by day's work, including use of lathes, tools, etc. This interview was on a Saturday after- noon; he regretted that the time was so short and that he had not called on us sooner, for if we desired to bid for any portion of the work we must do so by noon on Monday. To my surprise, on reference to Mr. Eckfeldt I found that there were no drawings or plans of any kind. The specifications were all in writing, and for the details of machinery reference was made to the machinery then in operation in the mint. That for the steam engine, gave diameter of cylinder, length of stroke, length of connecting rod, size and weight of fly-wheel, cylinder to be vertical, the general plan of engine to conform to that in the mint, which I think was a Rush and Muhlenberg engine, the successors of Oliver Evans.9S In addition to the shafting [were] pillow blocks, hangers, giving size and lengths, all of cast-iron, with coupling boxes, etc.; as to the rolling mill, draw benches, coining presses, milling machines, we were referred to those then in use. 98 In the U.S. Treasury Department's "Report on the Steam- Engines in the United States" (H. Ex. Doc. 21, 25th Cong., 3d sess., p. 156), the mint engine is listed as 30 horsepower, built in 1829-1830 by Rush and Muhlenberg. Early mint accounts show payment to Oliver Evans of $6508.52 on June 24, 1817, for a steam engine and sundry iron castings for machinery of the mint (Frank H. Stewart, cited in note 43 above, p. 186.) 72. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally

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