. Bulletin. Science. combination with other systems led to the present printing telegraph system. The high speed of transmission of the Baudot system was largely due to the replacement of the Morse code by an older one, the 5-unit code, which had originally been used in the Gauss-Weber and the Wheatstone-Cooke telegraph systems. In the 5-unit code each signal was formed by the proper combination of five plus or minus currents. The correct combination of currents was created by depressing the appropriate jacks on a keyboard equipped with five keys. There was one keyboard at each transmitting st

- Image ID: RH03FB
. Bulletin. Science. combination with other systems led to the present printing telegraph system. The high speed of transmission of the Baudot system was largely due to the replacement of the Morse code by an older one, the 5-unit code, which had originally been used in the Gauss-Weber and the Wheatstone-Cooke telegraph systems. In the 5-unit code each signal was formed by the proper combination of five plus or minus currents. The correct combination of currents was created by depressing the appropriate jacks on a keyboard equipped with five keys. There was one keyboard at each transmitting st
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RH03FB
. Bulletin. Science. combination with other systems led to the present printing telegraph system. The high speed of transmission of the Baudot system was largely due to the replacement of the Morse code by an older one, the 5-unit code, which had originally been used in the Gauss-Weber and the Wheatstone-Cooke telegraph systems. In the 5-unit code each signal was formed by the proper combination of five plus or minus currents. The correct combination of currents was created by depressing the appropriate jacks on a keyboard equipped with five keys. There was one keyboard at each transmitting station, and a number of these sta- tions were connected to the commutator. The com- mutator, as in Farmer's suggestion, connected each keyboard in succession to the line. Usually four key- boards were used; if so, there were four main seg- ments on the commutator, with one segment for each keyboard. Each segment was further subdivided with one subdivision for each key of the keyboard corre- sponding to that segment. As the brush on the com- mutator moved over the segments, each key of a given keyboard was connected in succession to the line. An. FiGUBLE 43.— Top: American lineman of the mid-igth century. Bottom: Construction of a telegraph line across the Missouri River in 1851. From T. ShafFner, The Telegraph Manual, New York, 1859, pp. 542, 666.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Smithsonian Institution; United States. Dept. of the Interior; United States National Museum. Washington, Smithsonian Institution Press, [etc. ]; for sale by the Supt. of Docs. , U. S. Govt Print. Off