. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. Zoology. 232 BULLETIN : MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY thought the fish might either belong to the Triakiclae (=Mus- telidae) or Carcharhinidae. Yet the shape and fin pattern of this shark, particularly the forward position of the first dorsal, are unlike those of any triakid or carcharhinid genus. Perhaps we have a new genus of sharks. The three other species from station 6 are teleosts; one of these is some kind of eel. At station 1 in the Gulf of Aden, the commonest fish, shown in nine frames, is a morid with a pair of long

- Image ID: RGF43T
. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. Zoology. 232 BULLETIN : MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY thought the fish might either belong to the Triakiclae (=Mus- telidae) or Carcharhinidae. Yet the shape and fin pattern of this shark, particularly the forward position of the first dorsal, are unlike those of any triakid or carcharhinid genus. Perhaps we have a new genus of sharks. The three other species from station 6 are teleosts; one of these is some kind of eel. At station 1 in the Gulf of Aden, the commonest fish, shown in nine frames, is a morid with a pair of long
Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RGF43T
. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. Zoology. 232 BULLETIN : MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY thought the fish might either belong to the Triakiclae (=Mus- telidae) or Carcharhinidae. Yet the shape and fin pattern of this shark, particularly the forward position of the first dorsal, are unlike those of any triakid or carcharhinid genus. Perhaps we have a new genus of sharks. The three other species from station 6 are teleosts; one of these is some kind of eel. At station 1 in the Gulf of Aden, the commonest fish, shown in nine frames, is a morid with a pair of long rays in each pelvic fin. These rays (Fig. 3) are proportionately longer than those in Phy si cuius roseus Alcock, the only known morid from the Gulf (see check list). Though P. longifilis Weber has two long pelvic rays, perhaps Laemonomodes Gilchrist is closest to our fish. Halosaurs, probably belonging to one species, were taken in four frames (PI. 2), and macrourids, representing at least three. Fig. 3. Beconstruction of a morid fish having two long, moveable rays in each pelvic fin. This was the commonest fish photographed in the Gulf of Aden.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Harvard University. Museum of Comparative Zoology. Cambridge, Mass. : The Museum