RMRGDFNW. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. Fig. 32.'—Adult of the Variegated Cutworm, about natural size. (Photograph by the author.). Fig. 33.—Adult of the Greasy Cutworm, somewhat enlarged. (Photograph by the author.) Life-history and Habits.—The number of generations of Cutworms annually is very difficult to determine, as they overlap in a most con- fusing manner. There are certainly several each year in North Carolina. Part of the Cutworms evidently pass the winter in the pupse condition, but most Cutworms pass the winter as partially gro
RMW22YYDArchive image from page 119 of Department bulletin (1923-1929). Department bulletin departmentbul11261150unit Year: 1923-1929. 22 BULLETIN 1128, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. somewhat uncommon in yellow birch, although the writer has found them from time to time in propeller stock of this species. Softwoods Fig. 8.—Transverse section of a branch of river birch, showing pith-ray flecks. Natural size.
RMPG1TDY. Natural history of the American lobster... Decapoda (Crustacea); Lobster fisheries. 262 BULLETIN OF THE BUREAU OF FISHERIES. of identifying the principal periods, however, is necessary, if we are to follow the course of development and the changes which attend the molt. Fortunately two guideposts are always present at either end of the series, the lock spine (fig. 12 L) and a distal spur or tubercle on the lower side of the propodus near its tip (Sp.) For convenience of description we assume, then, that the first period lies proximal to the spur, and that the "lock" spine is the pr
RMRGA87P. Bulletins of American paleontology. 42 Bulletin 361. Text-tigure .—Map of core locations discussed in this study. De- tailed locality information is provided in Table 1. and domes and pinelands in the Everglades and Big Cypress National Preserve; and mangrove forests along the Florida Bay and Whitewater Bay coasts (Text-fig. 2). This report presents reconstructions of the vegetational history of the Everglades ecosystem at several sites over the last two millennia and its re- sponse to both natural climatic fluctuations and altered land-use practices of the last century. Acknowledgments The
RMT245CHArchive image from page 243 of Dinocerata a monograph of Dinocerata : a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals dinoceratamonogr00mars Year: 1886 220 DINOCERATA, TJintatherium flssidens, Cope, sp. Woodcuts: 196 and 197, below. Fir. 191. FiftURE 193.—Lower jaw of Uintatliernmiflssidens (after Cope); top view. Figure 107.—The same specimen; front view. Both, figures are two-lbirds natural size. The above fig-ures were made by a direct transfer from the original woodcuts cited below. Cope (Bathyopsis flssidens).—Bulletin of the U. S. Geological Survey of the Territories, Vol. VI,
RMPG024N. The Arapaho. Arapaho Indians; Arapaho art; Symbolism in art; Picture-writing, Indian; Indians of North America; Indians of North America. 88 Bulletin American Museum of Natural History. [Vol. XVIII, on the body of the scabbard represent arrow-points. The squares in the middle are boxes, and the lines between them are the conventional morning-star cross. The small squares on the pendant attached to the point of the scabbard are cattle-tracks. The signification of the ornamentation on another knife- case (Fig. 6, Plate xiii) is as follows. The yellow background is the ground. The dark blade -
RMRGD2XN. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. 26 The Bulletin. Life History, etc.—The butterflies appear in very early spring and lay the yellow qggs on cabbage and related plants. The eggs hatch to small green ''worms" with velvety skin, which lie flat on the surface of the leaf. When grown the worm or caterpillar is about an inch long. Fig. 10.—Larva (or worm) of imported Cabbage Worm on cabbage leaf. Natural size. (Photo by Z. P. Metcalf.) and it then changes to the "chrysalis," or pupa, and from this the adult butterfly emerge
RMW0PXACArchive image from page 159 of A descriptive catalogue of the. A descriptive catalogue of the scale insects ('Coccidae') of Australia descriptivecatal02frog Year: 1915 154 SCIENCE BULLETIN, No. 18. Ascelis praemollis, Schrader (Fig. 107). Trans. Ent. Soc. N.S.W., vol. i, p. 7, pi. iii, figs, p-x, 1862. Signoret, Ann. Soc. Ent. France (5), vol. vi, p. 599, 1876. Froggatt, Pro. Linn. Soc. N.S. W., vol. viii, p. 211, 1893. Natural Science, vol. v, p. 113, 1894. Agric. Gazette N.S.W., vol. ix, p. 496, 1898. The galls are common upon the foliage of the bloodwood {Eucalyptus corymbosa) in the co
RMPFXFP4. A dictionary of the fossils of Pennsylvania and neighboring states named in the reports and catalogues of the survey ... Paleontology. Pteronites spergenensis. Whitfield, Bulletin No. 3, of ^^ 1. the American Museum of Natural History, N. Y.^ ^^-^^ 3 882. Collett's Indiana Report of 1882, plate 30, ^^^^m fig- 1> view of a left valve, maqniified twiGe, from f!Y::^^^ Spergen hill. Indiana. Sulcarhoniferous. XI.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may no
RMRGD2NT. The Bulletin of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. Agriculture -- North Carolina. Fig. 8 —Life-history of Southern Horn Worm. (Same as Frontispiece.) (a) Adult (natural size) ; (6) egg (enlarged); (c) larva (natural size); (d)pupa (slightly enlarged). (From photographs by the author.) Groups of Insects.—All insects are divided into groups according to their structure. The structure of the mouth parts is of vital im- portance in arranging insects under their proper groups. The struc- ture of the mouth parts is also of vital importance to the farmer who is attempting to control the
RMW0PW01Archive image from page 141 of A descriptive catalogue of the. A descriptive catalogue of the scale insects ('Coccidae') of Australia descriptivecatal02frog Year: 1915 136 SCIENCE BULLETIN, No. 18. Apiomorpha pharetrata, Sclirader (Fig. 92). Brachyscelis pharetrata. Trans. Ent. .Soc. i'.<S.ir., vo'. i, p. 4, pi. i, figs, o, s, pi. ii, fig. 39. 1862. Verh. Z. B. Ges. Wien. p. iii. fig. 2. 1863. Signoret, Ann. Soc. Ent., France, vol. vi, p. 595. 1876. „ ' Ffoggatt, Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W., p. 370. 1892. „ „ Natural Science, vol. v, p. 111. 1894. Agric. Gazette N.S.W., vol. ix, p. 491. 1898
RMPG026K. The Arapaho. Arapaho Indians; Arapaho art; Symbolism in art; Picture-writing, Indian; Indians of North America; Indians of North America. 70 Bulletin American Museum of Natural History. [Vol. XVIII, Fig. 17 shows the tent-omament design slightly altered, and used to cover one side of a ball. Tent-ornaments are generally attached to the tent with a certain amount of ceremony. This is done by an assemblage of old women, one or more of whom are possessors of one of the seven sacred women's bags that have been referred to. The ceremonies are similar to those that have been described as taking pl
RMRHDKMJ. Bonn zoological bulletin. Zoology. Mammals, other than bats, from the Misotshi-Kabogo highlands 205 a. Fig. 1. Map of the Albertine Rift with the Misotshi-Kabogo highlands (a), and position of the three collecting localities (b). following institutions: The Field Museum of Natural His- tory, Chicago (FMNH); the United States National Mu- seum, Washington D.C. (USNM); and the Zoologischcs Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Bonn (ZFMK). All specimens are deposited at the Field Museum of Nat- ural History, Chicago, IL. JCKP are the abbreviations for the senior author. Unless otherwise noted, ta