. Bulletin. Natural history; Natural history. Feb., 1971 Starrett: Mussels of the Illinois River 361 size: however, the bulk of the commercial fishery depended upon three-ridges hav- ing a height of 2.5-3.0 inches. There- Table 18.âSpecies composition of mussel shells in sorted commercial piles along the Illi- nois River at Meredosia and Kampsville in 1966. Percent Kind of of Number Shells m Mussel Measured Commercial Piles Three-Ridge 957 74.8 Washboard 200 15.6 Maple-Leaf 64 5.0 Pimple-Back 28 2.2 Others' 30 2.4 Total 1.279 100 0 â Included pig-toe. slough sand-shell, floaters, rock pocketbo

- Image ID: RGWDAH
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RGWDAH
. Bulletin. Natural history; Natural history. Feb., 1971 Starrett: Mussels of the Illinois River 361 size: however, the bulk of the commercial fishery depended upon three-ridges hav- ing a height of 2.5-3.0 inches. There- Table 18.âSpecies composition of mussel shells in sorted commercial piles along the Illi- nois River at Meredosia and Kampsville in 1966. Percent Kind of of Number Shells m Mussel Measured Commercial Piles Three-Ridge 957 74.8 Washboard 200 15.6 Maple-Leaf 64 5.0 Pimple-Back 28 2.2 Others' 30 2.4 Total 1.279 100 0 â Included pig-toe. slough sand-shell, floaters, rock pocketbook, and white heel-splitter (none of these was of any value either because of size or shell thickness and texture). fore, the adoption of a law requiring that three-ridges taken commercially from Illinois waters have a minimum height of 3.0 inches would virtually eliminate the commercial mussel fishery on the Illinois River. In 1966 Illinois regulations permitted the taking of rough shells 1.75 inches and smooth shells 3.0 inches or larger in their greatest dimensions. Under these regulations mussel fishermen were per- mitted to take shells that were too small for use by the pearl-culture industry. The buyers culled out many of the small shells and informed the fishermen that they needed shells having a height of at least 2.5 inches. The sorted piles of shells (Fig. 17) contained a variety of species of mussels living in the Alton pool, some of which had heights of only 1.5 inches. Many of the shells that had been sorted out were of noncommercial. Fig. 17.âA she! buyer's operation in 1966 below Kampsville, Illinois. Most of these shells were three-ridges (A. plicata) and washboards (M. giganteal taken by commercial mussel fishermen from the Alton pool of the Illinois River. Photo by Alvin C. Lopinot.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations ma