. Bulletin. Ethnology. Fig. 41. Series of jasper leaf forms representing successive steps in the specialization of arrow points. (i actual size.) San Bias. only and in that but rarely. The anvil-stone can not be shown to be characteristic of either of the groups exclusively, although it certainl}^ pertains in large measure to the pebble group, while the chipped pebbles are necessarily confined to the shore-pebble group. Fuller collections might show even still closer correspondence between the two groups. The differences do not seem so radical as to preclude the idea that a single people or cl

- Image ID: RGYXGM
. Bulletin. Ethnology. Fig. 41. Series of jasper leaf forms representing successive steps in the specialization of arrow points. (i actual size.) San Bias. only and in that but rarely. The anvil-stone can not be shown to be characteristic of either of the groups exclusively, although it certainl}^ pertains in large measure to the pebble group, while the chipped pebbles are necessarily confined to the shore-pebble group. Fuller collections might show even still closer correspondence between the two groups. The differences do not seem so radical as to preclude the idea that a single people or cl
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Image ID: RGYXGM
. Bulletin. Ethnology. Fig. 41. Series of jasper leaf forms representing successive steps in the specialization of arrow points. (i actual size.) San Bias. only and in that but rarely. The anvil-stone can not be shown to be characteristic of either of the groups exclusively, although it certainl}^ pertains in large measure to the pebble group, while the chipped pebbles are necessarily confined to the shore-pebble group. Fuller collections might show even still closer correspondence between the two groups. The differences do not seem so radical as to preclude the idea that a single people or closely related groups of people were responsible for all the chipped-stone work of these more northeastern coastal sites. This likelihood is considerably strengthened by the fact that differences in kind and form of material im- pose distinctions in the processes and in the things made. Comparing the whole work of the northern groups with that south of Bahia Blanca, it is seen that cer- tain culture differences are quite marked. The prev- alence of leaf-blade forms (fig. 41) and leaf-blade implements, variously specialized arrowheads and spearheads (pi. 13), and drill points (fig. 42), contrasts with the absence or decided rarity of these forms in the north. The rarity of the plano-convex knife blade (pi. 14) in the Rio Negro District (although it is common in southern Patagonia) is a noteworthy fact. The duck-bill scraper occurs much less frequently here than in the quartzite group of the north. The shaping processes are the same throughout, although the use of the anvil-stone was apparently exceptional in the south, being there devoted to the fracturing of pebbles and hence confined to the pebble-yielding areas.. Fig. 42. Drill-point of jasper. (i ac- tual size.) San Bias.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the o

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