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. Bulletin. Ethnology. BULL. 30] DELAWAEE 385 men, are descended several well-known families of Wisconsin and Minnesota. (C. T.) Delaware. A confederacy, formerly the most important of the Algonquian stock, occupying the entire basin of Delaware r. in K. Pennsylvania and s. e. New York, together with most of New Jersey and Delaware. Tliey called themselves Lenapeor Leni-lenape, equivalent to 'real men,' or 'native, genuine men'; the Eng- hsh knew them as Delawares, from the name of their principal river; the Frencli called them Loups, 'wolves,' a term probably applied originally to the Ma- hic

. Bulletin. Ethnology. BULL. 30] DELAWAEE 385 men, are descended several well-known families of Wisconsin and Minnesota. (C. T.) Delaware. A confederacy, formerly the most important of the Algonquian stock, occupying the entire basin of Delaware r. in K. Pennsylvania and s. e. New York, together with most of New Jersey and Delaware. Tliey called themselves Lenapeor Leni-lenape, equivalent to 'real men,' or 'native, genuine men'; the Eng- hsh knew them as Delawares, from the name of their principal river; the Frencli called them Loups, 'wolves,' a term probably applied originally to the Ma- hic Stock Photo
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. Bulletin. Ethnology. BULL. 30] DELAWAEE 385 men, are descended several well-known families of Wisconsin and Minnesota. (C. T.) Delaware. A confederacy, formerly the most important of the Algonquian stock, occupying the entire basin of Delaware r. in K. Pennsylvania and s. e. New York, together with most of New Jersey and Delaware. Tliey called themselves Lenapeor Leni-lenape, equivalent to 'real men,' or 'native, genuine men'; the Eng- hsh knew them as Delawares, from the name of their principal river; the Frencli called them Loups, 'wolves,' a term probably applied originally to the Ma- hican on Hudson r., afterward extended to the Munsee division and to the whole group. _To the more remote Algonquian. JACK HARRY (wAIAWAKWAKUMAU, TRAMPING EVERYWHERE) — DELAWARE tribes they, together with all their cog- nate tribes along the coast far up into New England, were known as Wapa- nachki, 'easterners,' or 'eastern land people,' a term which appears also as a specific tribal designation in the form of Abnaki. By virtue of admitted priority of political rank and of occupying the central home territory, from which most of the cognate tribes had diverged, they were accorded by all the Algonquian tribes the respectful title of "grand- father," a recognition accorded by cour- tesy also l)y the Huron. The Nanti- coke, Conoy, Shawnee, and Mahican claimed close connection with the Dela- wares and preserved the tradition of a common origin. The Lendpe, or Delawares proper, were composed of 3 principal tribes, treated by Morgan as phratries, viz: Munsee, Unami, and Unalachtigo (q. v.), besides which some of the New Jersey bands may have constituted a fourth. JEach of these had its own territory and dialect, with more or less separate identity, the Munsee i^ar- ticularly being so far differentiated as fre- quently to be considered an independent l^eople. The early traditional history of the Lenupe is contained in their national legend, the Walam Olum (q. v.). When they