. Bulletin. Ethnology. 1)i;nsmorb] NOOTKA AND QUILEUTE MUSIC 117 In explanation of the following song it was said "the wolves were always connected with the Klokali, so when the wolves howled it meant a good Klokali." Clayoquot 1=60 (Catalog No. 1435) No. 47. "The Wolves Are Howling' Recorded by Sakah Guy 66. TRANSLATION The wolves are howling, Let this be a pleasant day. Analysis.—In this pleasing melody we find no suggestion of its subject. The melody tones are those of the fourth five-toned scale and the ascending interval of a fourth at the close of the song is effective. Ac

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Image ID: RGYKKJ
. Bulletin. Ethnology. 1)i;nsmorb] NOOTKA AND QUILEUTE MUSIC 117 In explanation of the following song it was said "the wolves were always connected with the Klokali, so when the wolves howled it meant a good Klokali." Clayoquot 1=60 (Catalog No. 1435) No. 47. "The Wolves Are Howling' Recorded by Sakah Guy 66. TRANSLATION The wolves are howling, Let this be a pleasant day. Analysis.—In this pleasing melody we find no suggestion of its subject. The melody tones are those of the fourth five-toned scale and the ascending interval of a fourth at the close of the song is effective. According to one informant, the thunderbird dance at a Klokali was followed by the dance of the female elk, which was also danced on the roof of the house. The woman who represented the female elk wore a skirt made of narrow strips of deer hide wound at intervals with white basket gi-ass (pi. 22, h). Her face was painted black and her headdress consisted of a close cap of cloth on which feathers were fastened. Around this was a coil or crown of pounded cedar bark, and a strand of the bark hung down her back. It is believed these feathers became horns after the human being was changed into an elk. The anklets properly worn with this costume were of fawn hoofs, as elk hoofs were too heavy. They were made of pieces of the hoofs, suspended so they jingled, and similar ornaments were worn around the wrists. No attempt was made to harmonize this with the fore- going statement that the thunderbird dance was immediately followed by the lightning dance.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology. Washington : G. P. O.

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