. Bulletin. BULLETIN OF THE No. 48 Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry, Wm. A. Taylor, Chief December 19, 1913.. THE SHRINKAGE OF SHELLED CORN WHILE IN CARS IN TRANSIT. By J. W. T. Duvel, Crop Technologist in Charge of Grain Standardisation Investigations, and Laurel Duval, formerly in Charge of the Grain Stand- ardization Laboratory at Baltimore, Md. INTRODUCTION. In January, 1910, special investigations were begun at Baltimore, Md., to determine the amount of natural shrinkage or loss in weight of shelled corn containing various percentages of moisture daring transit in cars and w

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. Bulletin. BULLETIN OF THE No. 48 Contribution from the Bureau of Plant Industry, Wm. A. Taylor, Chief December 19, 1913.. THE SHRINKAGE OF SHELLED CORN WHILE IN CARS IN TRANSIT. By J. W. T. Duvel, Crop Technologist in Charge of Grain Standardisation Investigations, and Laurel Duval, formerly in Charge of the Grain Stand- ardization Laboratory at Baltimore, Md. INTRODUCTION. In January, 1910, special investigations were begun at Baltimore, Md., to determine the amount of natural shrinkage or loss in weight of shelled corn containing various percentages of moisture daring transit in cars and while in storage in elevators.1 The data on'shrinkage contained in these pages comprise the results of four special shipments of corn from Baltimore, Md., to Chicago, 111., and return. The first experiment, made April 15, 1910, was in cooperation with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co. The second, third, and fourth experiments were made in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Railroad Co. The second shipment was made on December 24, 1910; the third, March 2, 1911; and the fourth, May 11, 1911. The losses in weight shown for the various shipments do not include the losses in loading or unloading, but simply the natural shrinkage in the weight of the corn while in the cars. METHODS USED IN DETERMINING SHRINKAGE IN CORN. The freight cars used in these experiments were especially selected, uniform in design and condition, and specialty coopered to make them grain tight. The cars were held together on the track for several days prior to loading, so that there would be no variation in their weight due to differences in the condition of the wood. An empty box car of the same series and condition was moved in the same train with the loaded cars, as a check in determining the variation in weight due to the absorption or evaporation of moisture by the cars 1 The results of the first experiment of the series on the shrinkage of shelled corn in storage were published as Circular 81, Bureau

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