Bright days in sunny lands . ilight Fantasies ;And SorroW, pomp : the mobing pomp might seemLike pageantry of mist on an autumnal stream/ —Shelleys ^Adonais*. PREFACE. HALIBURTON says, quaintly, that the bee,though it finds every rose has a thorn, comesback loaded with honey from his rambles.With him, the Author believes in extracting all thehoney possible out of the thorny roses of foreignbloom. Why not ? Why use only the eyes and not theimagination? Old and sober-minded Doctor Johnsonlaid down the principle that the use of traveling isto regulate imagination by reality, and, instead ofthinki

Bright days in sunny lands . ilight Fantasies ;And SorroW, pomp : the mobing pomp might seemLike pageantry of mist on an autumnal stream/ —Shelleys ^Adonais*. PREFACE. HALIBURTON says, quaintly, that the bee,though it finds every rose has a thorn, comesback loaded with honey from his rambles.With him, the Author believes in extracting all thehoney possible out of the thorny roses of foreignbloom. Why not ? Why use only the eyes and not theimagination? Old and sober-minded Doctor Johnsonlaid down the principle that the use of traveling isto regulate imagination by reality, and, instead ofthinki Stock Photo
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Bright days in sunny lands . ilight Fantasies ;And SorroW, pomp : the mobing pomp might seemLike pageantry of mist on an autumnal stream/ —Shelleys ^Adonais*. PREFACE. HALIBURTON says, quaintly, that the bee,though it finds every rose has a thorn, comesback loaded with honey from his rambles.With him, the Author believes in extracting all thehoney possible out of the thorny roses of foreignbloom. Why not ? Why use only the eyes and not theimagination? Old and sober-minded Doctor Johnsonlaid down the principle that the use of traveling isto regulate imagination by reality, and, instead ofthinking how things may be, to see them as they are.All true, but if one does not find things as he supposesthem to be, what then ? The right spirit will take thingsas they are, and will love them for their own sake. There are always thorns, if one looks for them, tobe met v/ith in ones experiences in foreign lands,but also a vast amount of sweetness. Inconven-iences one must expect; some unhandsome thingsalso; but in place of discontent he should substituteenthusiasm and wholesome imagination. Then, whatmight otherwise prove a task becomes the most delight-