. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIENCE BULLETIN. Map 1. Location of Great Basin Desert. grasses are abundant in the subtypes of this commun- ity. Scattered stands of Douglas-fir, white fir, bristle- cone pine, ponderosa pine and aspen occur at higher elevations in the mountains. In this setting was impressed the grazing of live- stock and the attendant road building, fence con- struction, water development, and other activities which were to result in long-lasting changes in vegeta- tion, scars on the landscape, soil erosion, and c

. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIENCE BULLETIN. Map 1. Location of Great Basin Desert. grasses are abundant in the subtypes of this commun- ity. Scattered stands of Douglas-fir, white fir, bristle- cone pine, ponderosa pine and aspen occur at higher elevations in the mountains. In this setting was impressed the grazing of live- stock and the attendant road building, fence con- struction, water development, and other activities which were to result in long-lasting changes in vegeta- tion, scars on the landscape, soil erosion, and c Stock Photo
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. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIENCE BULLETIN. Map 1. Location of Great Basin Desert. grasses are abundant in the subtypes of this commun- ity. Scattered stands of Douglas-fir, white fir, bristle- cone pine, ponderosa pine and aspen occur at higher elevations in the mountains. In this setting was impressed the grazing of live- stock and the attendant road building, fence con- struction, water development, and other activities which were to result in long-lasting changes in vegeta- tion, scars on the landscape, soil erosion, and changes in water runoff. The region has been used primarily for winter graz- ing of livestock, but some portions were utilized throughout the year and others only in the summer. The winter range is dry, for there are only a few, small, widely dispersed springs, but the twigs of dor- mant shrubs are palatable and nutritious, and the dry grasses provide energy. Light snow cover provides water for the animals but seldom diminishes the avail- ability of forage. As snow recedes froin the valley and benches, sheep can be driven to the hills where drifts remain longer, and the early sheepmen found that by following the snow, which is used for stock water, they could use the desert ranges in the winter. As sheep populations grew, it became necessary to trail them farther into the deserts for feed. Througli co- operative efforts, the sheepmen developed the more. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Brigham Young University. Provo, Utah : Brigham Young University

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