. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BioLcx;icAL Seiues, '()l. 18, No. 3 Bheeuing Ecology of Utah IUptoks 21. Fig. 10. Cliff nesting site of Prairir Falcons and Great Homed Oivls in the western Thorpe Hills. l)V Starlings (Stunii.s vulgaris) nesting in the same localities. The onh' Short-eared Owl nest on the study area was located at an elevation of 4S90 feet. The nest site was placed at the base of a large clump of sagebmsh and was partially sheltered and hidden b' its branches. A few twigs had been arranged on the nest floor and down was placed among them;

- Image ID: RH4H6A
. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BioLcx;icAL Seiues, '()l. 18, No. 3 Bheeuing Ecology of Utah IUptoks 21. Fig. 10. Cliff nesting site of Prairir Falcons and Great Homed Oivls in the western Thorpe Hills. l)V Starlings (Stunii.s vulgaris) nesting in the same localities. The onh' Short-eared Owl nest on the study area was located at an elevation of 4S90 feet. The nest site was placed at the base of a large clump of sagebmsh and was partially sheltered and hidden b' its branches. A few twigs had been arranged on the nest floor and down was placed among them;
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RH4H6A
. Brigham Young University science bulletin. Biology -- Periodicals. BioLcx;icAL Seiues, \'()l. 18, No. 3 Bheeuing Ecology of Utah IUptoks 21. Fig. 10. Cliff nesting site of Prairir Falcons and Great Homed Oivls in the western Thorpe Hills. l)V Starlings (Stunii.s vulgaris) nesting in the same localities. The onh' Short-eared Owl nest on the study area was located at an elevation of 4S90 feet. The nest site was placed at the base of a large clump of sagebmsh and was partially sheltered and hidden b\' its branches. A few twigs had been arranged on the nest floor and down was placed among them; otherwise, no nest con- struction was attempted. Nests of the Burrowing Owl averaged 4920 ± 1.6 feet in elevation (range 4920-49.30 feet). The three nests of the 1969 season and two of the 1970 season were grouped together, fomiing small colonies which were located in a stand of grea.sewood, in dry sand and soil (Fisj. 11). The remaining nest was located in the bank of a dr)' reservoir. All were within unused burrows of kit foxes, badgers, or Townsend's ground squirrels. With feu' exceptions Raven nests were lo- cated in the most remote, inaccessible regions of the study area. Their average elevation was 5950 *- 65.5 feet (range 5590-6;32() feet). All were well constructed, compact, and set far back into a protective crevice. All had an over- hanging ledge or rockshelf which prevented direct exposure of the nest (Fig. 12). Reoccupation of Nests and Nesting Localities. Most of the regularly nesting raptor species showed a strong tendency to reoccupv their ter- ritories and often their exact nesting sites of the previous year. This was particularly true of crevice-nesting raptors, and it is probable that these partially protected sites are used for an indefinite number of breeding seasons. Table 12 summarizes the reoccupation data. Unfortunately it was not possible to mark individuals, hence it is impossible to detemiine if the same pairs were present each vear. However, many pa

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