. Breeder and sportsman. Horses. 286 3P*je fptJCje&cr aart sportsman. Sept. 12 Continued from Page 281. even shown such anger towards his rival when the race was against him as to resort to violence. Forrester was matched against a celebratei horse called Elephant. It was a four- mile coarse, and the horses ran nose to nose to the distance- poat when Elephant forged ever bo slightly ahead. No effort of Forrester conld regain f jr him the lost ground, and he finally made a despera'e plnnge and seized his competitor by the jaw and with difficulty coold be made to quit his hold. A similar ios

- Image ID: RH7FGT
. Breeder and sportsman. Horses. 286 3P*je fptJCje&cr aart sportsman. Sept. 12 Continued from Page 281. even shown such anger towards his rival when the race was against him as to resort to violence. Forrester was matched against a celebratei horse called Elephant. It was a four- mile coarse, and the horses ran nose to nose to the distance- poat when Elephant forged ever bo slightly ahead. No effort of Forrester conld regain f jr him the lost ground, and he finally made a despera'e plnnge and seized his competitor by the jaw and with difficulty coold be made to quit his hold. A similar ios
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RH7FGT
. Breeder and sportsman. Horses. 286 3P*je fptJCje&cr aart sportsman. Sept. 12 Continued from Page 281. even shown such anger towards his rival when the race was against him as to resort to violence. Forrester was matched against a celebratei horse called Elephant. It was a four- mile coarse, and the horses ran nose to nose to the distance- poat when Elephant forged ever bo slightly ahead. No effort of Forrester conld regain f jr him the lost ground, and he finally made a despera'e plnnge and seized his competitor by the jaw and with difficulty coold be made to quit his hold. A similar ios'ance occurred ia 1753; a splendid horse fi jding his antagonist gradually passing him, seized him by the hind legs, and both rider? were compelled to dismount in order to make him let loose the victim of his rage. Bnt it is not on the race-course only that horses exhibit an eager interest in the struggle going on. In the battle-field they have been known to take part in the dreadfal cootes1, and the proud charger has been seen to seize the opposing horse with tran- tio fury, aiding his rider in the-fight. W. L Eyre. THE STATE PAIR. Everything Booming—G-ood Races—Fine Exhib- its of Live Stock—Large Crowds in Attendance. Sacbamesto, Cal , Sept. 8, 1891. The State Fair g'oriously opened to a crowd of between three and four thousand, with an extra fast track and a sen- sational and heavy throw-down of what looked like a double- distilled "air-tight" when Myrtle beat Vida Wilkes for the Occident Stake, a three-year-old race for considerable coin. All of the State's gre itest breeders of the trotiing horse were there, a pleasaut breeze coursed through the lilacB of ihose blessed with hirsute appendages and made the hearts of the sweet maidens dressed to kill glad, while the lovers of iireproaehable collars sent up a silent prayer to the god of the winds. Everything around the fair grounds and grandstand was as the pro- verbial pin, an 1 the Liberati band discoursed i