Boscobel House is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. The building, in Shropshire was created around 1632, when landowner John Giffard of White Ladies Priory converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge. When Charles took refuge there, he was met by Colonel William Careless. He and the King spent all day hiding in a nearby oak tree (which became known as The Royal Oak), and later that night Charles hid in one of Boscobel’s priest holes. He eventually escaped the region disguised as the servant.

- Image ID: R4X70E
Boscobel House is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651.  The building, in Shropshire  was created around 1632, when landowner John Giffard of White Ladies Priory converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge. When Charles took refuge there, he was met by Colonel William Careless. He and the King spent all day hiding in a nearby oak tree (which became known as The Royal Oak), and later that night Charles hid in one of Boscobel’s priest holes. He eventually escaped the region disguised as the servant. Stock Photo
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Boscobel House is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. The building, in Shropshire was created around 1632, when landowner John Giffard of White Ladies Priory converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge. When Charles took refuge there, he was met by Colonel William Careless. He and the King spent all day hiding in a nearby oak tree (which became known as The Royal Oak), and later that night Charles hid in one of Boscobel’s priest holes. He eventually escaped the region disguised as the servant.
De Luan / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: R4X70E
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Boscobel House is most famous for its role in the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. The building, in Shropshire was created around 1632, when landowner John Giffard of White Ladies Priory converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge. In 1651, when Boscobel played host to Charles II, it was owned by John Giffard's heir, his widowed daughter, Frances Cotton. When Charles took refuge there, he was met by Colonel William Careless. He and the King spent all day hiding in a nearby oak tree (which became known as The Royal Oak), and later that night Charles hid in one of Boscobel’s priest holes. He eventually escaped the region disguised as the servant.
Location: Boscobel House, Shropshire, England