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Bamfords Patent,Perfect root cutter,machine in green,Uttoxeter,England,UK

Bamfords Patent,Perfect root cutter,machine in green,Uttoxeter,England,UK Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AFFF8X

File size:

34.9 MB (2.2 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

3024 x 4032 px | 25.6 x 34.1 cm | 10.1 x 13.4 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

24 January 2019

Location:

Great Budworth,Northwich,Cheshire,England,UK

More information:

The Bamford Root Cutter, a belt driven machine for cutter root vegetables and sugar beat for livestock feed. Joseph Bamford was born into a recusant Catholic family in Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, which owned Bamfords Ltd, an agricultural engineering business. His great grandfather Henry Bamford was born in Yoxall, and had built up his own ironmongers business, which by 1881 employed 50 men, 10 boys and 3 women. Bamfords International Farm Machinery became one of the country's major agricultural equipment suppliers, famous for its balers, rakes, hay turners, hay Wufflers, Mangold cutters, and standing engines, which were exported all over the world. The company eventually ceased trading in 1986. After attending Stonyhurst College, he joined the Alfred Herbert company in Coventry, then the UK's largest machine-tool manufacturer, and rose to represent the firm in Ghana. He returned home in 1938 to join the family firm, but in 1941 was called up by the RAF to serve in World War II. Working in supply and logistics, he returned to the African Gold Coast, to run a staging post for USAF planes being ferried to the Middle East. JCB On return home in 1944, Bamford initially worked for English Electric developing electric welding equipment in Stafford. A short return stint with the family firm proved too stifling, and his Uncle Henry released him, saying he thought Joe had "little future ahead of him." After selling Brylcreem for a short while, in October 1945 Bamford rented a 10 ft (3 m) by 15 ft lock-up garage for 30 shillings (= £1.50) a week, and made a farm trailer from scrap steel and war surplus Jeep axles, using a prototype electric welder bought for £2-10s (= £2.50). He opened for business on the day his first son, Anthony, was born, and sold the trailer for £45 and a cart, which he also repaired and sold for another £45. Having no interest in taking over rival businesses, his philosophy of: "Focus on what you do best, be innovative, and re-invest in product dev

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