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Ball gown. Culture: American. Date: ca. 1820. The puffed sleeves of this dress are an indication to the historicism in dress at the time. As a reinterpretation of 16th-century slashing, they make a statement about the Renaissance and the rebirth of artistic notions. The beautiful hem detail is also typical of the period spanning 1820. These details gave weight and shape to an otherwise unbroken line of fabric, which was so prevalent in the decades prior to it. The Empire silhouette is readily identified with its origins in the chiton of ancient Greco-Romans, which was a tubular garment

Ball gown. Culture: American. Date: ca. 1820.  The puffed sleeves of this dress are an indication to the historicism in dress at the time.  As a reinterpretation of 16th-century slashing, they make a statement about the Renaissance and the rebirth of artistic notions.  The beautiful hem detail is also typical of the period spanning 1820.  These details gave weight and shape to an otherwise unbroken line of fabric, which was so prevalent in the decades prior to it.    The Empire silhouette is readily identified with its origins in the chiton of ancient Greco-Romans, which was a tubular garment  Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Album / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PAPNGA

File size:

35.9 MB (849.5 KB Compressed download)

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Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2850 x 4400 px | 24.1 x 37.3 cm | 9.5 x 14.7 inches | 300dpi

Photographer:

Album

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Ball gown. Culture: American. Date: ca. 1820. The puffed sleeves of this dress are an indication to the historicism in dress at the time. As a reinterpretation of 16th-century slashing, they make a statement about the Renaissance and the rebirth of artistic notions. The beautiful hem detail is also typical of the period spanning 1820. These details gave weight and shape to an otherwise unbroken line of fabric, which was so prevalent in the decades prior to it. The Empire silhouette is readily identified with its origins in the chiton of ancient Greco-Romans, which was a tubular garment draped from the shoulders and sometimes belted beneath the bust. Several re-interpretations have occurred throughout costume history but none have been as notable as the period bridging the rectangular panierred skirts of the 18th century and the conical hoop skirts of the 19th century. The neoclassic style was adopted in all forms of decoration after the French Revolution and was upheld during the Napoleonic Wars partly due to Napoleon Bonaparte's (1769-1821) alliance with Greco-Roman principles. In fashion, the style began as children's wear made from fine white cotton, but was adopted by women in the form of a tubular dress with skirts that were gathered under the bust with some fullness over a pad at the back. As the style progressed the skirts began to flatten at the front and solely gather from the bodice at the center back. The style persisted until the 1820s when the waist slowly lowered and the skirts became more bell shaped. Museum: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

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