. Augsburg's drawing, book 2. ^ be made level bywedge-shaped cleats placed at the ends of the boards to neutralizethe slant of the seats and make the board level. Four boards are ordinarily enough if arranged judiciously.The pupils that sit in the seats across which the boards are placed,may draw at the blackboard or take vacant seats. It is not necessary for all pupils to draw from the same objector the same kind of object. Do not ask pupils to draw from a single object placed on theteachers desk. Only a few will be able to see such an object suffi-ciently plain to make a good drawing from it

- Image ID: 2AFYHGN
. Augsburg's drawing, book 2. ^ be made level bywedge-shaped cleats placed at the ends of the boards to neutralizethe slant of the seats and make the board level. Four boards are ordinarily enough if arranged judiciously.The pupils that sit in the seats across which the boards are placed,may draw at the blackboard or take vacant seats. It is not necessary for all pupils to draw from the same objector the same kind of object. Do not ask pupils to draw from a single object placed on theteachers desk. Only a few will be able to see such an object suffi-ciently plain to make a good drawing from it
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Image ID: 2AFYHGN
. Augsburg's drawing, book 2. ^ be made level bywedge-shaped cleats placed at the ends of the boards to neutralizethe slant of the seats and make the board level. Four boards are ordinarily enough if arranged judiciously.The pupils that sit in the seats across which the boards are placed,may draw at the blackboard or take vacant seats. It is not necessary for all pupils to draw from the same objector the same kind of object. Do not ask pupils to draw from a single object placed on theteachers desk. Only a few will be able to see such an object suffi-ciently plain to make a good drawing from it. Methods of Drawing Objects.— A method is an orderlyway of doing. It is an aid to the judgment, but should in no waytake the place of the judgment. The general method is the sameas used in drawing the cylinder. It is adapted with simple modi-fications to the diawing of nearly all objects. The method is asfollows :. 124 AUGSBURGS DRAWING. 1. Take the height. 2. Find the length, 3. Find prominent points. 4. Block in, and finish. For example, we will suppose the object is a potnto, Fig. 4.(1) Place the object as in Fig. 4. (2) Take the height A B thesize you wish the drawing. (3) Find the length, C D, by com-paring with your pencil the height A B on the object and compareit with the length, C D, and then make the same com[)arison in thedrawing. (4) Locate the eyes. (5) Block in and finish the drawing.