Alamy logo

. Atoll research bulletin. Coral reefs and islands; Marine biology; Marine sciences. Figure 1. The Pacific lithospheric plate, the surface of the Pacific plate but the majority of these igneous monoliths appear never to have reached the ocean surface and have therefore been preserved intact from alterations associated with subaerial weathering and erosion. Only occasionally do Pacific seamounts break the ocean surface forming islands. Some of these islands reflect characteristics of the submerged seamounts but take the form of tall volcanic peaks. More frequently they take the form of seamount

. Atoll research bulletin. Coral reefs and islands; Marine biology; Marine sciences. Figure 1. The Pacific lithospheric plate, the surface of the Pacific plate but the majority of these igneous monoliths appear never to have reached the ocean surface and have therefore been preserved intact from alterations associated with subaerial weathering and erosion. Only occasionally do Pacific seamounts break the ocean surface forming islands. Some of these islands reflect characteristics of the submerged seamounts but take the form of tall volcanic peaks. More frequently they take the form of seamount Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

RJY96J

File size:

7.2 MB (355.1 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2072 x 1207 px | 35.1 x 20.4 cm | 13.8 x 8 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. Atoll research bulletin. Coral reefs and islands; Marine biology; Marine sciences. Figure 1. The Pacific lithospheric plate, the surface of the Pacific plate but the majority of these igneous monoliths appear never to have reached the ocean surface and have therefore been preserved intact from alterations associated with subaerial weathering and erosion. Only occasionally do Pacific seamounts break the ocean surface forming islands. Some of these islands reflect characteristics of the submerged seamounts but take the form of tall volcanic peaks. More frequently they take the form of seamounts apparently truncated near sea level, capped by carbonate deposits, and variously described as atolls or reefs. Another striking feature of the Pacific plate is that islands of whatever type are normally only found in the somewhat shallower parts of the ocean near the East Pacific Rise, or where ocean temperatures normally remain above 22 C throughout the year. Although fewer in number volcanic islands have received much more attention from geoscientists and geologists interested in origins and dynamics than their carbonate counterparts the atolls. It was only following WWII that the Pacific Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences organized a major program into atoll research and the text, Atoll En)iAOnm<Lnt and Ecology by Harold Wiens (1962), represented a synthesis of this work. Perhaps partial blame for this lopsided research thrust was due to the seemingly explicable and visually more dynamic characteristics of volcanoes as compared to the confusion and disagreement surrounding the low, relatively featureless, atolls. Although back in 1842 Darwin proposed the simple yet elegant explanation that these atolls resulted from the slow submergence of volcanic islands his ideas were contested and went unproven until 1951 when drilling through the. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readabili

Save up to 30% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts

Search stock photos by tags