Astronomy for amateurs . t he burns yonder, in the midstof the pale cosmic cloud we term the Milky Way. Letus approach him, now that we have visited the Islesof Light in the Celestial Ocean; let us traverse the vastplains strewn with the burning gold of the Suns of theInfinite. We embark upon a ray of light, and glide rapidlyto the portals of our Universe. Soon we perceive atiny speck, scintillating feebly in the depths of Space,and recognize it as our own celestial quarters. Thislittle star shines like the head of a gold pin, and in-creases in size as we advance toward it. We traversea few mo

Astronomy for amateurs . t he burns yonder, in the midstof the pale cosmic cloud we term the Milky Way. Letus approach him, now that we have visited the Islesof Light in the Celestial Ocean; let us traverse the vastplains strewn with the burning gold of the Suns of theInfinite. We embark upon a ray of light, and glide rapidlyto the portals of our Universe. Soon we perceive atiny speck, scintillating feebly in the depths of Space,and recognize it as our own celestial quarters. Thislittle star shines like the head of a gold pin, and in-creases in size as we advance toward it. We traversea few mo Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJ2X2R

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7.1 MB (740.4 KB Compressed download)

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1451 x 1722 px | 24.6 x 29.2 cm | 9.7 x 11.5 inches | 150dpi

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Astronomy for amateurs . t he burns yonder, in the midstof the pale cosmic cloud we term the Milky Way. Letus approach him, now that we have visited the Islesof Light in the Celestial Ocean; let us traverse the vastplains strewn with the burning gold of the Suns of theInfinite. We embark upon a ray of light, and glide rapidlyto the portals of our Universe. Soon we perceive atiny speck, scintillating feebly in the depths of Space, and recognize it as our own celestial quarters. Thislittle star shines like the head of a gold pin, and in-creases in size as we advance toward it. We traversea few more trillion miles in our rapid course, and itshines out like a fine star of the first magnitude. Itgrows larger and larger. Soon we divine that it isour humble Earth that is shining before us, and gladlyalight upon her. In future we shall not quit our ownprovince of the Celestial Kingdom, but will enter into 92 OUR STAR THE SUN relations with this solar family, which interests us themore in that it affects us so closely.. Fig. 28.—Comparative sizes of the Sun and Earth, The Sun, which is manifested to us as a fine whitedisk at noon, while it is fiery red in the evening, at itssetting, is an immense globe, whose colossal dimensions 93 ASTRONOMY FOR AMATEURS surpass those of our terrestrial atom beyond all con-ceivable proportion. In diameter, it is, in effect, io8^ times as large asthe Earth; that is to say, if our planet be represented bya globe I meter in diameter, the Sun would figure as asphere io8/^ meters across. This is shown on the ac-companying figure (Fig. 28), which is in exact propor-tion. If our world were set down upon the Sun, with all itsmagnificence, all its wealth, its mountains, its seas, itsmonuments, and its inhabitants, it would only be an im-perceptible speck. It would occupy less space in thecentral orb than one grain in a grenade. If the Earthwere placed in the center of the Sun, with the Moonstill revolving round it at her proper distance of 384, -000

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