. [Articles about birds from National geographic magazine]. Birds. 94 The National Geographic Magazine. Photo by Viola McColm NOT DEAD, BUT PLAYING POSSUM squirrels of Washington injures the wheat crop in a single county of that State to the extent of half a million dol- lars annually. While the loss to this country by rodents by no means equals that caused by insects, the total reaches far into the millions and is a serious drain on the national resources. To devise methods of combating these pests, of reducing their numbers, and, if possible, of accomplishing their exter- mination is one of

- Image ID: PFY92J
. [Articles about birds from National geographic magazine]. Birds. 94 The National Geographic Magazine. Photo by Viola McColm NOT DEAD, BUT PLAYING POSSUM squirrels of Washington injures the wheat crop in a single county of that State to the extent of half a million dol- lars annually. While the loss to this country by rodents by no means equals that caused by insects, the total reaches far into the millions and is a serious drain on the national resources. To devise methods of combating these pests, of reducing their numbers, and, if possible, of accomplishing their exter- mination is one of
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PFY92J
. [Articles about birds from National geographic magazine]. Birds. 94 The National Geographic Magazine. Photo by Viola McColm NOT DEAD, BUT PLAYING POSSUM squirrels of Washington injures the wheat crop in a single county of that State to the extent of half a million dol- lars annually. While the loss to this country by rodents by no means equals that caused by insects, the total reaches far into the millions and is a serious drain on the national resources. To devise methods of combating these pests, of reducing their numbers, and, if possible, of accomplishing their exter- mination is one of the important problems dealt with by the Biological Survey. By the use of traps, of poisoned foods, and of gases to kill the animals in their bur- rows, much has been accomplished. Failure to secure the utmost results aimed at by these methods is due chiefly to the difficulty of securing the coopera- tion of all the farmers in an infested re- gion. It is evident that if a number of landholders withhold their aid, their farms become nurseries from which to re- populate adjoining districts. Moreover, in most regions there are sterile and un- productive areas which receive no atten- tion, and these again are harbors of ref- uge for the pests which later emerge to restock farming lands. Hence the con- test appears to be a never-ending one. and is a constant source of loss and an- noyance to the farmer. The difficulties of warfare against ro- dents are in inverse proportion to the set- tlement of the country. Where farms are large and there is much waste land, the difficulties are very great; but when farms are comparatively small and there is little unoccupied land, cooperation be- tween landholders is easier to secure and results are more encouraging. In parts of Kansas, for instance, where formerly farming population was scarce and prairie dogs numerous and destructive, the animals have been practically ex- terminated as the result of the continued effort of numerous ranchers wor

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