Archive image from page 727 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 658 VELVET BEAN VETCH nor is it subject to other diseases. It makes a very large growth of vegetable matter to be resolved into humus. On the basis of ten tons of green vines per acre, the crop contains 150 to 200 pounds of nitrogen with ten or twelve pounds in the roots alone. The nodules produced on the roots by the nitrogen-collecting bacteria are much larger than those found on th

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Archive image from page 727 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 658 VELVET BEAN VETCH nor is it subject to other diseases. It makes a very large growth of vegetable matter to be resolved into humus. On the basis of ten tons of green vines per acre, the crop contains 150 to 200 pounds of nitrogen with ten or twelve pounds in the roots alone. The nodules produced on the roots by the nitrogen-collecting bacteria are much larger than those found on th
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Image ID: W1WDD5
Archive image from page 727 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 658 VELVET BEAN VETCH nor is it subject to other diseases. It makes a very large growth of vegetable matter to be resolved into humus. On the basis of ten tons of green vines per acre, the crop contains 150 to 200 pounds of nitrogen with ten or twelve pounds in the roots alone. The nodules produced on the roots by the nitrogen-collecting bacteria are much larger than those found on the roots of our common legumes. They are brownish black in color, warty, broad, flat, and frequently measure an inch and a quarter across. The interior is greenish white or greenish pink in color. As an ornamental.—The rapid growth and the large clean foliage of the velvet bean gives it dis- tinct value as an annual ornamental covering for trellises and for porch screens. In fact, it was as an ornamental that the velvet bean was first used in this country. Literature. Bulletins Nos. 35 and 60, Florida Experiment Station; Bulletins Nos. 104 and 120, Alabama Experiment Station; Farmers' Bulletin, United States Department of Agriculture, Nos. 102 and 300 ; Hume, Citrus Fruits and Their Culture, pages 290-293 ; Shaw, Forage Crops, New York City. VETCH. Vicia spp. Leguminosce. Fig. 891, 892. By J. F. Dug gar. The vetches are of importance as cover-crops and as stock-feed. They have never become very popular, partly because of the low trailing habit, and partly because of the high price of the seed. Most of the seed is procured in Europe. When over two years old it sometimes germinates poorly. Botanical characters. The vetches, wnth few exceptions, are slender, climbing plants, bearing tendrils at or near the extremity of each pinnate leaf. They are herba- ceous plants with weak stems, requiring the support of other plants, such as the small grains, when grown for hay. The numerous