Archive image from page 716 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 TOBACCO TOBACCO 647 Connecticut Havana tobacco. The seed-bed.—For this variety the seed-bed should be located about as for the Sumatra variety. A southern slope where good drainage can be secured is preferable, and a good, rich and friable soil is desirable. As a rule, 200 square feet of seed- bed space should be provided to furnish sufficient seedlings for an acre, although, if the t

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Archive image from page 716 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 TOBACCO TOBACCO 647 Connecticut Havana tobacco. The seed-bed.—For this variety the seed-bed should be located about as for the Sumatra variety. A southern slope where good drainage can be secured is preferable, and a good, rich and friable soil is desirable. As a rule, 200 square feet of seed- bed space should be provided to furnish sufficient seedlings for an acre, although, if the t
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Image ID: W1WD4W
Archive image from page 716 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 TOBACCO TOBACCO 647 Connecticut Havana tobacco. The seed-bed.—For this variety the seed-bed should be located about as for the Sumatra variety. A southern slope where good drainage can be secured is preferable, and a good, rich and friable soil is desirable. As a rule, 200 square feet of seed- bed space should be provided to furnish sufficient seedlings for an acre, although, if the tobacco is to be transferred at different periods a less area will be found to be sufficient. The seed-beds are gener- ally eight feet wide and as long as is necessary to furnish sufficient seedlings for the field. They are usually laid out from east to west. The framework of the seed-bed is made of 2 X 12-inch boards, set in the ground three to four inches, one side being sunk two inches lower than the other in order that the sash may lie in a slanting position, so that the plants will receive all of the sunlight possible. The best method of covering the bed is by means of glass in sash about three feet wide by eight feet long. These sash are laid over the top of the framework, and can be removed at any time when it is necessary. In some cases, heavy cheese-cloth or tobacco-cloth is substituted for the glass covering, but the tem- perature of the beds can not be regulated so well as with the glass cover, and the cloth should not be used when very early plants are desired. It is asserted by old tobacco-growers, however, that the plants raised under cloth are more hardy than those raised under glass, and it is a frequent practice to grow the early plants under glass and the later seedlings under cloth. A successful method of heating seed-beds is by the use of fresh horse manure. In this case the beds should be dug out two feet deep about a week before the time for sowing the se