Archive image from page 708 of The cyclopædia of anatomy and. The cyclopædia of anatomy and physiology cyclopdiaofana03todd Year: 1847 NEItVOUS CENTRES. (HUMAN ANATOMY. THE EMCEPIIALON.) Fig. 394. 695 Superior surface of the right hemisphere of the adult human brain. The undulating form of many of the convolutions is very well seen, and the general characters of the convoluted surface are displayed. of the rabbit, the beaver, the guinea-pig, the agouti shew these fissures. They are generally regular in different individuals of the same genus, and they are symmetrical, i. e., of the same le

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Archive image from page 708 of The cyclopædia of anatomy and. The cyclopædia of anatomy and physiology  cyclopdiaofana03todd Year: 1847 NEItVOUS CENTRES. (HUMAN ANATOMY. THE EMCEPIIALON.) Fig. 394. 695    Superior surface of the right hemisphere of the adult human brain. The undulating form of many of the convolutions is very well seen, and the general characters of the convoluted surface are displayed. of the rabbit, the beaver, the guinea-pig, the agouti shew these fissures. They are generally regular in different individuals of the same genus, and they are symmetrical, i. e., of the same le Stock Photo
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Archive image from page 708 of The cyclopædia of anatomy and. The cyclopædia of anatomy and physiology cyclopdiaofana03todd Year: 1847 NEItVOUS CENTRES. (HUMAN ANATOMY. THE EMCEPIIALON.) Fig. 394. 695 Superior surface of the right hemisphere of the adult human brain. The undulating form of many of the convolutions is very well seen, and the general characters of the convoluted surface are displayed. of the rabbit, the beaver, the guinea-pig, the agouti shew these fissures. They are generally regular in different individuals of the same genus, and they are symmetrical, i. e., of the same le
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Archive image from page 708 of The cyclopædia of anatomy and. The cyclopædia of anatomy and physiology cyclopdiaofana03todd Year: 1847 NEItVOUS CENTRES. (HUMAN ANATOMY. THE EMCEPIIALON.) Fig. 394. 695 Superior surface of the right hemisphere of the adult human brain. The undulating form of many of the convolutions is very well seen, and the general characters of the convoluted surface are displayed. of the rabbit, the beaver, the guinea-pig, the agouti shew these fissures. They are generally regular in different individuals of the same genus, and they are symmetrical, i. e., of the same length and direction, and occupy the same place on each hemisphere. Leuret remarks, in reference to the dogma of Gall and Spurzheim, that the presence and number of the convolutions are in direct rela- tion to the volume of the brain, that such is far from being universally the case; and I am glad to refer to so excellent an authority in confirmation of the view which I have advo- cated respecting the true signification of the cerebral convolutions. According to this ana- tomist, the ferret, which has several well-marked convolutions on each hemisphere, has a brain no larger than that of the squirrel, which is entirely devoid of them, and which has not even the few fissures which faintly indicate their first developement in the brains of the rabbit, the beaver, the agouti, &c. And these animals last named have the brain actually larger than that of the cat, the pole-cat, the roussette, (Pteropusvulgaris,) the unau, ( Bra- dypus didactylus,) the sloth, (Bradi/pus tridac- tylits,) and the pangolin, all of which possess convolutions. All mammiferous animals, excepting those mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, have convolutions which exhibit more or less of complication. This complication has evidently no connection with the general organization o'f the animal, inasmuch as we find animals, in the same family with those which possess numerous convolutions, exhibiting a very sligh