Archive image from page 623 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 5G0 RYE RYE individual grains on the head are partly exposed instead of being entirely enclosed within the glumes, as in wheat. They are also somewhat longer, more slender and more pointed at the end which is the point of attachment to the spike. The longitudinal crease or suture, which is so charac- teristic of wheat, is very much less marked in rye. Rye is darker in color, with a

- Image ID: W1W988
Archive image from page 623 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 5G0 RYE RYE individual grains on the head are partly exposed instead of being entirely enclosed within the glumes, as in wheat. They are also somewhat longer, more slender and more pointed at the end which is the point of attachment to the spike. The longitudinal crease or suture, which is so charac- teristic of wheat, is very much less marked in rye. Rye is darker in color, with a
Actep Burstov / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: W1W988
Archive image from page 623 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 5G0 RYE RYE \ individual grains on the head are partly exposed instead of being entirely enclosed within the glumes, as in wheat. They are also somewhat longer, more slender and more pointed at the end which is the point of attachment to the spike. The longitudinal crease or suture, which is so charac- teristic of wheat, is very much less marked in rye. Rye is darker in color, with a slightly wavy or wrinkled surface and exceedingly hard and tough in texture, requiring more power to mill than any other grain. Rye 'shoots' the spike or head in the spring much sooner than winter wheat, but the time of maturity is usually not more than one week earlier. As the young plant- lets emerge above ground they have a dis- tinctly red tinge, which markedly distin- guishes them from young wheat plants, and the fall growth is more spreading or decum- bent than in wheat, while in spring, before heading, the leaves take on a grayish green that is ditferent from other grains. The flow- ering glume is always awned or bearded, and the large anthers shed their pollen in great profusion, so that on bright, windy days it may sometimes be seen drifting across the field like puffs of thin yellow smoke. The leaves largely lose their vitality before the grain is mature, and, as in wheat, the stems probably perform the physiological function of leaves. Rye is a more hardy plant than wheat and is grown in more ex- treme northern latitudes, and yet it seems more tolerant of hot weather also. It is probable that its zone of successful growth covers a wider range of climatic conditions than any other cereal. History. The culture of rye,while more than two thousand years old, is still cot so ancient as that of wheat and barley. De CandoUe states that its original home was between the Aust