Archive image from page 575 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 516 PEANUT PEAXUT Other fertilizers which are sufrgested for pea- nuts are acid phosphate 80 pounds, cottonseed meal 300 pounds, kainit 240 pounds. Another for- mula recommended is acid phosphate 100 pounds, dried blood 1S5 pounds, muriate of potash G5 pounds. Since the peanut is a leguminous plant, drawing its nitrogen largely from the soil air, the fertilizer used need not be highly

- Image ID: W1W5DM
Archive image from page 575 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 516 PEANUT PEAXUT Other fertilizers which are sufrgested for pea- nuts are acid phosphate 80 pounds, cottonseed meal 300 pounds, kainit 240 pounds. Another for- mula recommended is acid phosphate 100 pounds, dried blood 1S5 pounds, muriate of potash G5 pounds. Since the peanut is a leguminous plant, drawing its nitrogen largely from the soil air, the fertilizer used need not be highly
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Image ID: W1W5DM
Archive image from page 575 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 516 PEANUT PEAXUT Other fertilizers which are sufrgested for pea- nuts are acid phosphate 80 pounds, cottonseed meal 300 pounds, kainit 240 pounds. Another for- mula recommended is acid phosphate 100 pounds, dried blood 1S5 pounds, muriate of potash G5 pounds. Since the peanut is a leguminous plant, drawing its nitrogen largely from the soil air, the fertilizer used need not be highly nitrogenous, although in each of the formulas given there is much nitro- gen ; the cottonseed meal in the first carries a considerable percentage, while dried blood in the last also contains nitrogen. A dressing of 250 to 500 pounds to the acre of either of these mixtures should be suffi- cient. The North Carolina Depart- ment of Agriculture is using a fer- tilizer analyzing 7 to 8 per cent of available phosphoric acid, 4 per cent potash, and 1 to 2 per cent nitrogen. Planting.— By the use of a small turning plow two furrows are thrown up in the form of a back furrow or ridge over the line of the furrow first opened, in the method employed in preparing land for the reception of sweet - potato sets. After the ridges are thrown up they are knocked off either by the weeder or by using a board scraper fastened to the back teeth cf an ordinary Planet Jr. or Iron Age cultivator. The planter follows on the ridges, drop- ping the seed at intervals of about eight inches, two seeds in a place, and placing the seeds deep enough to be on the same plane as the general level of the .surface of the field. The ridges are brushed down to about two inches in height and the seeds are planted about two inches deep. On soils that are likely to be grassy or weedy seeds are dropped somewhat farther apart, about twelve inches, and two or three .seeds in a hill. If the seeding is to be done by hand,