Archive image from page 467 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 Fig. 637. Sectional view of a cylinder com-sheller. within which corn may be ensiled with excellent results. If put in very immature and without par- tial drying, it will become excessively acid and will sometimes develop disagreeable flavors. It is a mistake to ensile corn in this condition, for the amount of nutrients is very much less than at a later period. Sometimes, however, it

- Image ID: W1TBJC
Archive image from page 467 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 Fig. 637. Sectional view of a cylinder com-sheller. within which corn may be ensiled with excellent results. If put in very immature and without par- tial drying, it will become excessively acid and will sometimes develop disagreeable flavors. It is a mistake to ensile corn in this condition, for the amount of nutrients is very much less than at a later period. Sometimes, however, it
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Image ID: W1TBJC
Archive image from page 467 of Cyclopedia of farm crops . Cyclopedia of farm crops : a popular survey of crops and crop-making methods in the United States and Canada cyclopediaoffarm00bailuoft Year: 1922, c1907 Fig. 637. Sectional view of a cylinder com-sheller. within which corn may be ensiled with excellent results. If put in very immature and without par- tial drying, it will become excessively acid and will sometimes develop disagreeable flavors. It is a mistake to ensile corn in this condition, for the amount of nutrients is very much less than at a later period. Sometimes, however, it may be neces- sary to handle late corn in this condition when frost is at hand. For example, south of Pennsylvania, in the truck- ing and canning sections, ex- cellent crops of silage corn are often secured after a crop of garden peas, but the corn may lack maturity when frost comes. Corn that is over-ripe or even badly frosted and dried will make good silage if there is a fair amount of moisture remaining. The less water in the corn when cut, the more serious the surface loss will be. When very dry, silage is almost free of acid, but it tends to spoil by white mold. It molds long way down from the surface and near the corners of a square silo, or where, for any reason, it fails to pack tightly. Corn has occa- sionally been put into the silo with- out any shredding, by laying the stalks compactly, shingle fashion. It is pos- sible to make a very finequality of silage in this way, but the care and difficulty, both in putting in and in feeding out, has led to the aban- donment of the practice. The corn is nearly always cut or shredded into the silo. Ordinarily, the finer it is cut the better the results, owing to the more intimate mixture of the grain and leaves and the more compact settling. Fig. 638. Skeleton view of combination force feed sheller