Archive image from page 406 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922 THE BUFFALO-BERRY THE BUFFALO-BERRY 357 fruit. This is the form usually sold by nur- serymen. The fruit of the American type is hardly better than that of the European as usually found, but the plant seems to be more variable; occasionally plants are found bearing fruits of pleasant acid taste, which are very agreeable substitutes for the cranberry. Tak- ing advantage of this fact, A. E. Morgan, Dayton, Ohio, has spent some years in de- veloping varieties suitable for

Archive image from page 406 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits  cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922  THE BUFFALO-BERRY THE BUFFALO-BERRY 357 fruit. This is the form usually sold by nur- serymen. The fruit of the American type is hardly better than that of the European as usually found, but the plant seems to be more variable; occasionally plants are found bearing fruits of pleasant acid taste, which are very agreeable substitutes for the cranberry. Tak- ing advantage of this fact, A. E. Morgan, Dayton, Ohio, has spent some years in de- veloping varieties suitable for Stock Photo
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Archive image from page 406 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922 THE BUFFALO-BERRY THE BUFFALO-BERRY 357 fruit. This is the form usually sold by nur- serymen. The fruit of the American type is hardly better than that of the European as usually found, but the plant seems to be more variable; occasionally plants are found bearing fruits of pleasant acid taste, which are very agreeable substitutes for the cranberry. Tak- ing advantage of this fact, A. E. Morgan, Dayton, Ohio, has spent some years in de- veloping varieties suitable for garden culture. Plants of six of Morgan's named varieties and many of his unnamed seedlings are now- growing on the grounds of the New York Agri- cultural Experiment Station, Geneva, New York, in charge of the author. These are just coming into fruit, and their merits cannot as yet be passed upon with certainty, but the behavior of the various plants shows clearly that the groups are distinct and that in them we have a newly domesticated fruit of much value. The product is as palatable as that of the true cranberry, although hardly as pleas- ant eating, because of the seeds. The fruits are as attractive in appearance as those of the cranberry, will probably keep as long, and will certainly ship as well. The plants are hardier, as the originals came from the cold northern plains of Canada; they are probably freer from insects and fungi; whether more or less productive on equal areas of ground remains to be seen, but certainly they can be grown more cheaply, since the cost of establishing a plantation is far less; and, probably, they can be grown in many of the northern states, whereas the true cranberry grows in very re- stricted areas in a few states. From what has already been done, it can be seen that the cranberr>'-tree responds quickly to the plant-breeder. Fruits and plants have many merits to recommend them, which is sufficient reason to continue their improve- ment;

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