Archive image from page 254 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922 207. Sugar. (XD parent, Agen. The fruits of Sugar in the East are not larger than those of Agen, while in California they are said to be twice or three times as large; the flavor is not so pleasant, although in California the fruit of Sugar is said to be of better quality than that of Agen. The trees of the two plums are much alike, though those of Agen are larger and more productive than those of Sugar as grown in New York. The variety was introduced by its originato

Archive image from page 254 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits  cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922  207. Sugar. (XD parent, Agen. The fruits of Sugar in the East are not larger than those of Agen, while in California they are said to be twice or three times as large; the flavor is not so pleasant, although in California the fruit of Sugar is said to be of better quality than that of Agen. The trees of the two plums are much alike, though those of Agen are larger and more productive than those of Sugar as grown in New York. The variety was introduced by its originato Stock Photo
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Archive image from page 254 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhar00hedr Year: 1922 207. Sugar. (XD parent, Agen. The fruits of Sugar in the East are not larger than those of Agen, while in California they are said to be twice or three times as large; the flavor is not so pleasant, although in California the fruit of Sugar is said to be of better quality than that of Agen. The trees of the two plums are much alike, though those of Agen are larger and more productive than those of Sugar as grown in New York. The variety was introduced by its originator, Burbank, in 1899. Tree of medium size, vigorous, spreading, dense-topped, hardy, productive. Leaves oval, 2 inches wide, 5 inches long; apex abruptly pointed; base acute; mar- gin serrate, with small dark glands; petiole 1 inch long, covered with thick pubescence, tinged with red, glandless or with 1-3 small, globose, greenish-yellow glands. Fruit midseason ; small, oval, halves equal cavity shallow, narrow, abrupt; suture shallow, often a line; apex roundish or pointed; color dark reddish- purple, changing to purplish-black, covered with thick bloom ; dots numerous, small, light russet; stem slender, long, pubescent, adhering; skin thin, tender, separating readily; flesh golden-yellow, juicy, coarse, fibrous, ten- der, sweet, mild ; good to very good ; stone light colored, with a tinge of red, thin, of medium size, ovate, flat- tened, with rough and pitted surfaces, blunt at the base, acute at the apex. SURPRISE. P. hortulana Mineri. Sur- prise is one of the best of the native plums. The fruits are ver>' attractive in appearance. and, while not of the rich flavor of the Do- mesticas, they are yet of pleasant flavor; have an abundance of juice; keep well and ship well; and the color is a peculiar red which serves to identify the variety. The trees are productive. Surprise, according to Martin Penning, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, is the best of a thousand or more seedlings grow

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