Archive image from page 185 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhard00hedr Year: 1922 156 WRAGG YELLOW SPANISH ing and shipping, and are very susceptible to brown-rot. It is one of the first of the sweet cherries—large, yellowish-white tinted with shades of crimson—a beautiful fruit. The flesh separates readily from the skin, is tender, juicy, with an abundance of colorless juice and a flavor that has given it the reputation of being one of the best in quality. It would be hard to name another cherry better suited for small plantations. Wood was raise

Archive image from page 185 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits  cyclopediaofhard00hedr Year: 1922  156 WRAGG YELLOW SPANISH ing and shipping, and are very susceptible to brown-rot. It is one of the first of the sweet cherries—large, yellowish-white tinted with shades of crimson—a beautiful fruit. The flesh separates readily from the skin, is tender, juicy, with an abundance of colorless juice and a flavor that has given it the reputation of being one of the best in quality. It would be hard to name another cherry better suited for small plantations. Wood was raise Stock Photo
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Archive image from page 185 of Cyclopedia of hardy fruits (1922). Cyclopedia of hardy fruits cyclopediaofhard00hedr Year: 1922 156 WRAGG YELLOW SPANISH ing and shipping, and are very susceptible to brown-rot. It is one of the first of the sweet cherries—large, yellowish-white tinted with shades of crimson—a beautiful fruit. The flesh separates readily from the skin, is tender, juicy, with an abundance of colorless juice and a flavor that has given it the reputation of being one of the best in quality. It would be hard to name another cherry better suited for small plantations. Wood was raised by J. P. Kirtland in 1842 at Cleveland, and named in honor of Reuben Wood, Governor of Ohio. Tree vigorous, upright-spreading, open, productive. Leaves numerous, 4 incites long, 2V4 inches wide, folded upward, obovate, thin; apex acute; base abrupt; margin coarsely and doubly serrate, glandular; petiole 1 inches long, slender, with from one to three reniform, reddish glands. Flowers 1 inch across, arranged in twos and threes. Fruit matures in early midseason; 1 inch in diameter, roundish-cordate, compressed; cavity wide, flaring; suture distinct, wide; apex roundish; color crimson on a yellowish-white background; dots numer- ous, small, light russet, conspicuous; stem slender, 1 / inches long, adhering well to the fruit; skin thin, tender, separating from the pulp ; flesh whitish, juice colorless, tender, mild, sweet ; very good; stone clinging, large, roundish, blunt, with smooth surfaces; with a broad, ventral suture. WRAGG. P. Cerasus. Wragg is either English Morello or a strain of that variety. In Iowa, where the new variety is most largely grown, poraologists claim that it is distinct and that it is an improvement on English Morello. The American Pomological Society calls English Morello and Wragg the same. Those who believe that the two are distinct say that the fniit of Wragg is larger, the trees hardier and that the cherries ripen a little later than those of Engl

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