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Archive image from page 181 of Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising. Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches cyclopediaofamer01bail1 Year: 1900 251. Erdody Begonia (X Ys). No. 107. (See Begonia, p. 151.) spring flower beds, the clumps are divided into single plants during the previous September, or early enough to allow the new plants to get a firm ho

Archive image from page 181 of Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising. Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches  cyclopediaofamer01bail1 Year: 1900  251. Erdody Begonia (X Ys). No. 107. (See Begonia, p. 151.) spring flower beds, the clumps are divided into single plants during the previous September, or early enough to allow the new plants to get a firm ho Stock Photo
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Archive image from page 181 of Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising. Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers, and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches cyclopediaofamer01bail1 Year: 1900 251. Erdody Begonia (X Ys). No. 107. (See Begonia, p. 151.) spring flower beds, the clumps are divided into single plants during the previous September, or early enough to allow the new plants to get a firm hold before winter, and are placed 3 in. apart in a narrow trench. These edgings must be renewed each year, as the plants, if they grow well, spread too wide, or irregularly. In dry summers many roots fail, and if they remain in the game spot year after year, the fls. will degenerate to the single condition. The simplest way of propagating and growing Eng- lish Daisies for spring bedding in this country is to sow the seed in shallow boxes about August 10. As soon as large enough to handle, transplant 5 inches apart into coldframes, and when the winter sets in put on the sash, giving air whenever the weather may be mild. Transplant to the flower beds as early as pos- sible in the spring, where in a very short time they will be a mass of bloom, and will continue to bloom till the beginning of June, when they should be thrown out, and the summer bedding plants planted. Longfellow and Snowball are the two best varieties for this purpose. Myosotis alpestris and Silene pendula may be grown the same way, using the Daisies as edging when in the beds, and the others as center pieces. The Daisy is propagated by seeds (which are sown early), and by di- visions, the choicest vai'ieties be- ing maintained by the latter method. The main types growd from seed are the white, rose, quilled, and white with red center, all of which are double. A dark red is less common. Of kinds prop, by seed, Long