Archive image from page 1386 of Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy (1914). Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy cunninghamstextb00cunn Year: 1914 ( THE SPLEEK 1353 gastric, and renal surfaces; anterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, gastric, and basal surfaces; posterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, renal, and basal surfaces; intermediate, at the junction of the renal, gastric, and basal surfaces. In a spleen of orange-segment form there are but two angles, a superior and an anterior. The superior is bounded in the same way as in the tetrahedral form; the anterior, by the dia- p

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Archive image from page 1386 of Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy (1914). Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy cunninghamstextb00cunn Year: 1914 ( THE SPLEEK 1353 gastric, and renal surfaces; anterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, gastric, and basal surfaces; posterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, renal, and basal surfaces; intermediate, at the junction of the renal, gastric, and basal surfaces. In a spleen of orange-segment form there are but two angles, a superior and an anterior. The superior is bounded in the same way as in the tetrahedral form; the anterior, by the dia- p
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Image ID: W9HB0F
Archive image from page 1386 of Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy (1914). Cunningham's Text-book of anatomy cunninghamstextb00cunn Year: 1914 ( THE SPLEEK 1353 gastric, and renal surfaces; anterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, gastric, and basal surfaces; posterior, at the junction of the diaphragmatic, renal, and basal surfaces; intermediate, at the junction of the renal, gastric, and basal surfaces. In a spleen of orange-segment form there are but two angles, a superior and an anterior. The superior is bounded in the same way as in the tetrahedral form; the anterior, by the dia- phragmatic, gastric, and renal surfaces. In all spleens, but most commonly in those of oblique, irregularly tetrahedral form, the superior angle may curve forward as a blunt hook. The spleen is entirely covered with peritoneum and is moored by two peritoneal folds, the lieno-renal and gastro-splenic ligaments (pp. 1162 and 1236). Inferiorly it is supported by the peritoneal phrenico-colic ligament (p. 1242). RibX Rib XI Descending colon Rib X Rib XI Ascending colon Fig. 1062.—Dissection of the Spleen, Liver, and Kidneys from behind, in a Subject hardened by Formalin-injection. As a rule they are attached to Small globular accessory spleens are often present, the gastro-splenic ligament near the splenic hilus. Blood and Lymph Vessels.—The spleen receives its blood from the splenic artery, which passes through the lieno-renal ligament. Before reaching the gland it breaks up into six or more branches which enter the hilus independently. The vein of the spleen, the splenic vein, is formed in the lieno-renal ligament by the union of several unnamed tributaries which emerge from the hilus. The lymph vessels also leave the spleen at the hilus. They are small and come from the capsule and trabeculse only, not from the glandular part of the organ. Nerves.—The nerves are almost entirely non-medullated and come from the cceliac plexus. They accompany the sjlenic artery and its bra