Anthropology; an introduction to the study of man and civilization . iting remained asan ornamental pattern. It may well have been through suchintermediate stages that the earliest potters came to see thatthey could shape the clay alone and burn it hard. Thisshaping was doubtless at first done by hand, as in Americaor Africa the native women may still be seen building up XI.] ARTS OF LIFE. 275 large and shapely jars or kettles from the bottom, mouldingon the clay bit by bit. So in Europe, as any museum of an-tiquities shows, the funeral urns and other earthen vesselsof the stone and bronze age

Anthropology; an introduction to the study of man and civilization . iting remained asan ornamental pattern. It may well have been through suchintermediate stages that the earliest potters came to see thatthey could shape the clay alone and burn it hard. Thisshaping was doubtless at first done by hand, as in Americaor Africa the native women may still be seen building up XI.] ARTS OF LIFE. 275 large and shapely jars or kettles from the bottom, mouldingon the clay bit by bit. So in Europe, as any museum of an-tiquities shows, the funeral urns and other earthen vesselsof the stone and bronze age Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJ53BH

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7.1 MB (141.2 KB Compressed download)

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1597 x 1564 px | 27 x 26.5 cm | 10.6 x 10.4 inches | 150dpi

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Anthropology; an introduction to the study of man and civilization . iting remained asan ornamental pattern. It may well have been through suchintermediate stages that the earliest potters came to see thatthey could shape the clay alone and burn it hard. Thisshaping was doubtless at first done by hand, as in Americaor Africa the native women may still be seen building up XI.] ARTS OF LIFE. 275 large and shapely jars or kettles from the bottom, mouldingon the clay bit by bit. So in Europe, as any museum of an-tiquities shows, the funeral urns and other earthen vesselsof the stone and bronze ages were hand-made; and evennow tourists who visit the Hebrides buy earthen cups andbowls of an old woman who makes them in ancestralfashion without a potters wheel, and ornaments them withlines drawn with a pointed stick. Yet the potters wheelwas known in the woild from high antiquity. Fig. 73 re-presents Egyptian potters at work, as shown in the wall-paintings of the Tombs of the Kings. It is seen that theyturned the wheel by hand. So the Hindu potter is described.

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