. Annual report of the Trustees of the State Museum of Natural History for the year ... Science; Museums. Fig. 56. — Larva and eggs of the spring canker-worm — Anis- OPTEEYX VEENATA. (After Eiley.) Fig. 57.—Male and female moths and en- largements of Anisopteeyx teenata. (After Eiley.) moth and h the wingless female, each in natural size; c, enlargement of portion of female antennae; d, joint of female abdomen, enlarged; e, its ovipositor, enlarged. * Tinea pellionella Linn.— This notorious pest — the common clothes-moth, carpet-moth, fur-moth (different names for the same insect), etc., was f

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. Annual report of the Trustees of the State Museum of Natural History for the year ... Science; Museums. Fig. 56. — Larva and eggs of the spring canker-worm — Anis- OPTEEYX VEENATA. (After Eiley.) Fig. 57.—Male and female moths and en- largements of Anisopteeyx teenata. (After Eiley.) moth and h the wingless female, each in natural size; c, enlargement of portion of female antennae; d, joint of female abdomen, enlarged; e, its ovipositor, enlarged. * Tinea pellionella Linn.— This notorious pest — the common clothes-moth, carpet-moth, fur-moth (different names for the same insect), etc., was f Stock Photo
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. Annual report of the Trustees of the State Museum of Natural History for the year ... Science; Museums. Fig. 56. — Larva and eggs of the spring canker-worm — Anis- OPTEEYX VEENATA. (After Eiley.) Fig. 57.—Male and female moths and en- largements of Anisopteeyx teenata. (After Eiley.) moth and h the wingless female, each in natural size; c, enlargement of portion of female antennae; d, joint of female abdomen, enlarged; e, its ovipositor, enlarged. * Tinea pellionella Linn.— This notorious pest — the common clothes-moth, carpet-moth, fur-moth (different names for the same insect), etc., was f
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. Annual report of the Trustees of the State Museum of Natural History for the year ... Science; Museums. Fig. 56. — Larva and eggs of the spring canker-worm — Anis- OPTEEYX VEENATA. (After Eiley.) Fig. 57.—Male and female moths and en- largements of Anisopteeyx teenata. (After Eiley.) moth and h the wingless female, each in natural size; c, enlargement of portion of female antennae; d, joint of female abdomen, enlarged; e, its ovipositor, enlarged. * Tinea pellionella Linn.— This notorious pest — the common clothes-moth, carpet-moth, fur-moth (different names for the same insect), etc., was first observed in flight in my office, as early as Febru- ary thirteenth. During March, and especially toward the latter part of the month, the moths were not uncommon. On April twenty-third, note was made of their being quite numerous. They were also reported to me as flj^ng in abundance. May fourteenth, from a bag with hops and pieces of flannel; the flannel was found almost entirely eaten. The above early appearances of the insect are noted, as Professor Fernald, in his excellent paper discussing the confused synonymy of the species, states that " the moths emerge in June and July, and some even as late as August, yet there is but a single generation " {Canadian Entomologist, xiv, 1882, p. 167). Dr. Packard represents the moth as beginning to fly about our apartments in May {Guide to the Study of Insects, 1866, p. 346). Dr. Harris states that they lay their eggs in May or June, and indicates early June as the time in which the prudent housekeeper should beat up their quarters and put them to flight or destroy their eggs and young {Insects Injurious to Vegetation, 1862, pp. 493, 494). Probably the nearly uniform day and night temperature of my o£6.ce during the winter, maintained by the steam-heating arrange- ments of the Capitol, serve to shorten the period of pupation, when compared with its usual period in our dwellings. * Mallota sp.— Professor L. M.