. Annual report of the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University and the Agricultural Experiment Station. New York State College of Agriculture; Cornell University. Agricultural Experiment Station; Agriculture -- New York (State). RiRAL School Leaflet 1149 better to have a pure breed of poultry than common stock. The}' should remember, however, that not all pure-bred fowls are good fowls. Whether pure-bred or mongrel stock is kept, it must be vigorous and healthy. In ncarh- every flock of chickens or fowls there are good ones and poor ones; in some flocks there are exceptiona

- Image ID: RM807W
. Annual report of the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University and the Agricultural Experiment Station. New York State College of Agriculture; Cornell University. Agricultural Experiment Station; Agriculture -- New York (State). RiRAL School Leaflet 1149 better to have a pure breed of poultry than common stock. The}' should remember, however, that not all pure-bred fowls are good fowls. Whether pure-bred or mongrel stock is kept, it must be vigorous and healthy. In ncarh- every flock of chickens or fowls there are good ones and poor ones; in some flocks there are exceptiona
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Image ID: RM807W
. Annual report of the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University and the Agricultural Experiment Station. New York State College of Agriculture; Cornell University. Agricultural Experiment Station; Agriculture -- New York (State). RiRAL School Leaflet 1149 better to have a pure breed of poultry than common stock. The}' should remember, however, that not all pure-bred fowls are good fowls. Whether pure-bred or mongrel stock is kept, it must be vigorous and healthy. In ncarh- every flock of chickens or fowls there are good ones and poor ones; in some flocks there are exceptionally good ones and exceptionally poor ones. Very likely the good ones are profitable, and the poor ones are kept at a loss. If money is to be made from fowls or chickens, only good ones should be kept. E\'ery chicken should be regarded as a living machine for making food into meat or eggs. Unless the machine is a good one, satisfactory results cannot be obtained from the food. ]\Iany flocks of chickens may be divided into five classes: (i) chickens that are growing and not laying (young pullets and cockerels); (2) those that arc laying and not growing (mature hens); (3) those that are growing and laying (puUets); (4) those that are neither gro\^ing nor laying (old hens and roosters); (5) those that are losing weight and not laying (old or sick hens and roosters). All five of these groups are eating valuable food, and, if they are all kept together, they will probably eat more than they earn. If the last two groups are disposed of, the others may pay a good profit There will be less work to do in caring for those that remain, and they will have more room. Moreover, the good chickens by themselves will look far more attractive, will grow better, will lay better, and will be less likely to suffer from disease than they would be if kept with the others. There are several types of unprofitable chickens that should not be kept: 1. A chicken of any breed or age that shows signs of sick