. Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Institution. Archives; Discoveries in science. 310 THE TELEPHONOGRAPH. sitiids of times. It is said that a record has been reproduced 2,200 times and has still been very perfect, and such a spool containing a record could be shipped across the country and placed on another machine, and would reproduce the sounds which originally caused the record with absolute perfection, and even a rusty wire contain- ing a record has been sandpapered and polished without affecting appreciably the reco

- Image ID: RM4XK7
. Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Institution. Archives; Discoveries in science. 310 THE TELEPHONOGRAPH. sitiids of times. It is said that a record has been reproduced 2,200 times and has still been very perfect, and such a spool containing a record could be shipped across the country and placed on another machine, and would reproduce the sounds which originally caused the record with absolute perfection, and even a rusty wire contain- ing a record has been sandpapered and polished without affecting appreciably the reco
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RM4XK7
. Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Institution. Archives; Discoveries in science. 310 THE TELEPHONOGRAPH. sitiids of times. It is said that a record has been reproduced 2,200 times and has still been very perfect, and such a spool containing a record could be shipped across the country and placed on another machine, and would reproduce the sounds which originally caused the record with absolute perfection, and even a rusty wire contain- ing a record has been sandpapered and polished without affecting appreciably the record. In tig. 5. letter D, is indicated, first, how the steel band is magnetized by the obliterating magnet, then by the varying field of the recording magnet, and finally by the reversal in direction. The Poulsen telephonograph in its ordinary form does not speak louder than an ordinary Bell telephone. 1 would suggest the employment of Edison's ''electro-motograph,, or "chalk" telephone receiver, by means of which it could be made to speak very loud. (An audience of 5.<»o has been able to hear perfectly this Edison's loud-speaking telephone.) Mr. Poulsen has suggested a number of other methods by which the sound coidd be aug-. #cc£/r//yG T£l£phoh£. Fig. 4.—The talking newspaper. mented. It is claimed that by increasing the speed during reproduc- tion, over that of the recording speed, the telephone speaks much louder. This would, however, tend only to increase the pitch, and not improve the volume of the sound. Other methods suggested by Mr. Poulsen are indicated in fig. 5, letters A and C. They con- sist in substance of methods for causing one transmitter to make a number of records on separate steel wires or bands which, on repeat- ing, cause the various reproducing magnets to simultaneously affect the one telephonic receiver. It has also been proposed to utilize the telephonograph as a talking newspaper. In fig. -1 is shown a method which it is proposed to

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