. Annual report. New York State Museum; Science; Science. Fig. 1 Cryst .Is of gypsum. At the right a twinned for.n. (H. P. Whitlock, del.) crystals are characterized by an easy cleavage parallel to the prin- cipal plane (face h in figures). Thin flakes so produced are flex- ible, but not elastic like mica to which they bear some resemblance. If benit sharply they break in a diagonal direction with the produc- tion of fibers. The cleavage plates of gypsum can be distinguished from foliated talc by their greater (hardness, which is inferior, however, to that of anhydrite or calcite. Gypsum occup

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Image ID: RMAEFY
. Annual report. New York State Museum; Science; Science. Fig. 1 Cryst .Is of gypsum. At the right a twinned for.n. (H. P. Whitlock, del.) crystals are characterized by an easy cleavage parallel to the prin- cipal plane (face h in figures). Thin flakes so produced are flex- ible, but not elastic like mica to which they bear some resemblance. If benit sharply they break in a diagonal direction with the produc- tion of fibers. The cleavage plates of gypsum can be distinguished from foliated talc by their greater (hardness, which is inferior, however, to that of anhydrite or calcite. Gypsum occupies the second place in the Mohis scale of hardness, according to which certain minerals are selected as standard and numbered in order of imcreasing hardness from I to 10. In this scale talc is i and calcite 3. The specific gravity of gypsum when pure is 2.3. Gypsum is only slightly soluble in pure water (o-ne part dissolv- ing in 415 parts of water at 32°F. and in 368 parts of water at 100.4° F.) but its solubility is considerably increased in the presence of salts of the alkalis, such as sodium and potassium chlorids. Con- centrated acids are generally poor solvents, sulfuric having no. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. New York State Museum. Albany : University of the State of New York

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