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. Annual report, including a report of the insects of New Jersey, 1909. 536 REPORT OF NEW JERvSEY STATE MUSEUM, Sub-family Anerastin^. P. approxlmella Wlk. d. (Kf). PEORIA Rag. (hsematica Zell.) Newark IV and VI (Wdt); g. Family PTEROPHORID^. This family contains the species commonly known as "plume moths," because the wrings are split up into from two to five plumes or feathers, which make the species recognizable at a glance. The moths are all small in size, usually with disproportionatelj" long legs and altogether frail in structure. The caterpillars are hairy and at first si

. Annual report, including a report of the insects of New Jersey, 1909. 536 REPORT OF NEW JERvSEY STATE MUSEUM, Sub-family Anerastin^. P. approxlmella Wlk. d. (Kf). PEORIA Rag. (hsematica Zell.) Newark IV and VI (Wdt); g. Family PTEROPHORID^. This family contains the species commonly known as "plume moths," because the wrings are split up into from two to five plumes or feathers, which make the species recognizable at a glance. The moths are all small in size, usually with disproportionatelj" long legs and altogether frail in structure. The caterpillars are hairy and at first si Stock Photo
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. Annual report, including a report of the insects of New Jersey, 1909. 536 REPORT OF NEW JERvSEY STATE MUSEUM, Sub-family Anerastin^. P. approxlmella Wlk. d. (Kf). PEORIA Rag. (hsematica Zell.) Newark IV and VI (Wdt); g. Family PTEROPHORID^. This family contains the species commonly known as "plume moths," because the wrings are split up into from two to five plumes or feathers, which make the species recognizable at a glance. The moths are all small in size, usually with disproportionatelj" long legs and altogether frail in structure. The caterpillars are hairy and at first sight some of them resemble miniature Arctiids, but they spin up leaves or make tubes and differ in other essential characters of structure. The species are not usually common and are best or only obtainable by breeding. They are therefore not well represented in collections as a rule. TRICHOPTILUS WIsm. T. lobidactylus Fitch. Essex Co. VII, in fields, not rare (Kf); larva on golden rod, "Solidago canadensis." T. ochrodactylus Fish. Wenonah V, 30 (Dke); 5-mile beach VII, 4 (Haim). OXYPTILUS Zell. O. periscelidactylus Fitch. The "Grape Plume" moth; common throughout the State, the larva webbing up the tips of the vines in early spring. They do no real injury in most cases because as a rule they spin up the tip b-eyond the blossom cluster. O. delawaricus Zell. Mass. to California, and sure to occur in New Jersey. O. tenuidactyius Fitch. Ft. Lee VII, 4 (Dke); Essex Co. VI, 20-VII, 7, not rare in open woods and at light (Kf); 5-mile beach VII, 4 (Haim). PLATYPTILIA Hbn. P. acanthodactyla Hbn. Essex Co. V- VII and IX, common (Kf). P. marginidactyla Fitch. Essex Co., VI, VII, abundant (Kf); food plant yar- row, "Achillea millefolium" (Bt). N^.. Fig. 228.—The grape plume, Oxy- ptilus periscelidactylus: a, larva in web; h, pupa; c, its "breast- bone," enlarged; d, moth; e, segment of larva, enlarged.. Please note that these images are extracted f