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. Annual report. Agricultural education. 1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 31 111. with dirt mixed with this fluid, which forms a mass nearly im- pervious to water, after it hardens. See Fig. 11. The number of eggs deposited by the different species varies con- siderably, some laying only twenty- five or thirty in one mass, but deposit- ing several masses, while others, as the reel-winged grass- hopper (Hippiscus tuberculatus), cle- posit all, to the number of 125 or 130, in one mass. The different species vary also in the selection of places for depositing their eggs ; some species may frequently b

. Annual report. Agricultural education. 1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 31 111. with dirt mixed with this fluid, which forms a mass nearly im- pervious to water, after it hardens. See Fig. 11. The number of eggs deposited by the different species varies con- siderably, some laying only twenty- five or thirty in one mass, but deposit- ing several masses, while others, as the reel-winged grass- hopper (Hippiscus tuberculatus), cle- posit all, to the number of 125 or 130, in one mass. The different species vary also in the selection of places for depositing their eggs ; some species may frequently b Stock Photo
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. Annual report. Agricultural education. 1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 31 111. with dirt mixed with this fluid, which forms a mass nearly im- pervious to water, after it hardens. See Fig. 11. The number of eggs deposited by the different species varies con- siderably, some laying only twenty- five or thirty in one mass, but deposit- ing several masses, while others, as the reel-winged grass- hopper (Hippiscus tuberculatus), cle- posit all, to the number of 125 or 130, in one mass. The different species vary also in the selection of places for depositing their eggs ; some species may frequently be seen, in the fall, digging holes and laying their eggs in the hard gravel of a well-travelled road. The young grasshoppers are very large eaters ; and, in the proc- ess of growth, they molt or shed their skins from three to five times. At the second or third molt, rudimentary wing covers ap- pear, and the insect is called a pupa ; but previous to this time it is called a larva. At the last molt the wings and wing covers appear fully developed, and then the insect is called an imago, — perfect or mature insect. See Fig. 12. Fig. 11. Grasshoppers laying eggs. a, a, a, female in different positions. b, egg pod. c, separate eggs. d, e, earth removed to expose the pods.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Massachusetts Agricultural College; Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station; Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. Annual report of the Hatch Experiment Station of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Boston : [s. n. ]

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