. Annals of the South African Museum = Annale van die Suid-Afrikaanse Museum. Natural history. m. Fig. 2. Hindlimb elements of Oceanites ('Pelagodroma'). A-B. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24405, L24390U, left femora in cranial aspect showing variation in size and robustness. C. O. marinus, USNM 496760, left femur, cranial aspect. D. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24386Q, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. E. O. marinus, USNM 496760, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. All figures X 2. 1978), and the shaft of a humerus the size and shape of that of Oceanites oceanicus from Duinefontein (Olso

- Image ID: RMJNJG
. Annals of the South African Museum = Annale van die Suid-Afrikaanse Museum. Natural history. m. Fig. 2. Hindlimb elements of Oceanites ('Pelagodroma'). A-B. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24405, L24390U, left femora in cranial aspect showing variation in size and robustness. C. O. marinus, USNM 496760, left femur, cranial aspect. D. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24386Q, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. E. O. marinus, USNM 496760, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. All figures X 2. 1978), and the shaft of a humerus the size and shape of that of Oceanites oceanicus from Duinefontein (Olso
Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RMJNJG
. Annals of the South African Museum = Annale van die Suid-Afrikaanse Museum. Natural history. m. Fig. 2. Hindlimb elements of Oceanites ('Pelagodroma'). A-B. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24405, L24390U, left femora in cranial aspect showing variation in size and robustness. C. O. marinus, USNM 496760, left femur, cranial aspect. D. O. zaloscarthmus sp. nov., L24386Q, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. E. O. marinus, USNM 496760, right tarsometatarsus, plantar aspect. All figures X 2. 1978), and the shaft of a humerus the size and shape of that of Oceanites oceanicus from Duinefontein (Olson in press a). Despite the relative abundance of Oceanites zaloscarthmus at Langebaanweg, the species is entirely absent at Duinefontein. This may reflect differences in the depositional environment at these two sites. That so many bones of O. zaloscarthmus were concentrated at Langebaanweg is an almost certain indication that the species was breeding close by, probably on the islands lying immediately offshore from the Langebaanweg site (Hendey 19816, 1982; Olson 1983, in press a). The probable presence of a breeding colony is also indicated by incompletely ossified bones of young, though possibly volant, individuals among the fossil sample. The living species Oceanites marinus is rather widely distributed, nesting on islands in waters that lie in warm Subantarctic and especially in cool Subtropical waters. Although the species disperses widely in the non-breeding season, it has not as yet been recorded from South African waters (Clancey 1980; Harrison 1983). There are breeding populations on islands around western and southern Australia, in the New Zealand region, and in the Atlantic in the Salvages, Cape Verdes, and Tristan da Cunha (Jouanin & Mougin 1979). The species was once. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly res