Alamy logo

. An illustrated history of our war with Spain : its causes, incidents, and results. fortified towns, and came tounderstand it as an emblem of rapacity, cruelty, and greed.One autumn day in 1868 Antonio returned to his fathersplantation from Baracoa with the information that the Cubanshad rebelled. The father, being a careful man, at once ad-vised his family to remain strictly neutral. But they secretlyexulted over the successes of their countrymen, and it mayhave been that the Spaniards obtained an inkling of their sen-timents. At any rate, Spanish spies began to annoy them,and more than once

. An illustrated history of our war with Spain : its causes, incidents, and results. fortified towns, and came tounderstand it as an emblem of rapacity, cruelty, and greed.One autumn day in 1868 Antonio returned to his fathersplantation from Baracoa with the information that the Cubanshad rebelled. The father, being a careful man, at once ad-vised his family to remain strictly neutral. But they secretlyexulted over the successes of their countrymen, and it mayhave been that the Spaniards obtained an inkling of their sen-timents. At any rate, Spanish spies began to annoy them,and more than once Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CENMC9

File size:

7.1 MB (0.3 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1187 x 2105 px | 20.1 x 35.6 cm | 7.9 x 14 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

. An illustrated history of our war with Spain : its causes, incidents, and results. fortified towns, and came tounderstand it as an emblem of rapacity, cruelty, and greed.One autumn day in 1868 Antonio returned to his fathersplantation from Baracoa with the information that the Cubanshad rebelled. The father, being a careful man, at once ad-vised his family to remain strictly neutral. But they secretlyexulted over the successes of their countrymen, and it mayhave been that the Spaniards obtained an inkling of their sen-timents. At any rate, Spanish spies began to annoy them,and more than once they were threatened. The revolutionhad been in progress for some months, and the Spaniards werewild over a series of disasters, when there appeared at theMaceo plantation a band of Spanish guerrillas. Maceo andhis older sons were away with a mule train. They returned at nightfall. As the plantation came intoview, a horrifying sight met the gaze of Maceo and his sons.Where his home had been there was nothing but a smoulder-ing heap of ashes and embers. His barns were burned, his.